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51 At the massacre of Schenectady, February 9, 1690, he was carried prisoner to Canada, along with two of his father's slaves. Upon returning to Schenectady, he acted in his father's stead as Trustee of the Schenectady Patent. In 1711, he and four others built Fort Hunter at the junction of the Mohawk River and the Scheris Creek. He was a lieutenant in Captain Glen's Company in 1715. He removed to the vicinity of Fort Hunter in 1733 and became one of the first settlers of that locality. He was granted 430 acres there in 1737, part still being owned and occupied by some of his descendants. He was also granted 1935 acres near Schenectady in 1737. WBW

Excerpts from papers sent to me by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI on September 5, 1996. From THE MOHAWK VALLEY: ITS LEGENDS AND ITS HISTORY, 1609-1780 W. Max Reid pg 299:

Myndert, the eldest son of Jan Barentse Wemp, had a son Johannes, also called Jan, or John, who, in 1711, lived in the 'Mohawk's country, on the Mohawk River.' On the 11th day of October of that year, Governor Hunter made a contract with John Wemp, Garret Symonse, Barent Vroman, Hendrick Vroman, and Arent Van Patten, of Schenectady, to build the fortification called Fort Hunter, at the mouth of the Schoharie River, and Queen Anne's Chapel, which was situated inside the palisade or fort. The fort and chapel were completed in 1712.

Jan Wemp, as he was called by his Dutch neighbors, owned part of the fourth flat of the Schenectady patent, which was located at Pattersonville. On December 16, 1737, he obtained a patent of 450 acres of land in the town of Florida, located east of Queen Anne's Chapel glebe, and adjoining the same on the west, and the Babbington patent of 1717, on the east. He died October 14, 1749. He married first, Catalina, daughter of Reyer Schermerhorn, June 15, 1700, and second, Ariaantje, daughter of Isaac Swits, October 6, 1709, and had twelve children; six sons and six daughters.

Johannes Myndert Wemple's will as recorded in THE WEMPLE FAMILY, by William C. Wemple and sent to me by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI on September 5, 1996:

In the name of God, Amen, I, Jan Wemple, of the Mohawk Country, on the Mohawk River, in the County of Albany, being of perfect, sound mind and memory, blessed be God, wherefore but considering the frailty of this life, and certainty of death, and the uncertain time and hour thereof, do therefore this fifth day of March, in the 21 year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Second, and the year of our Lord Christ one thousand seven hundred and forty seven and eight, make ordain and publish this my last will and testament -

That is to say principally and first of all I give and commend my immortal soul after its departure our this frail body, into the merciful hands of God that gave it me. Hoping and trusting for the pardon of my sins and transgressions, in and thru the meritorious death and passion of the Blessed Son of God, Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Redeemer.

As my body, I recommend it to the earth to be interred in a Christian like and decent manner, at the discretion of my wife and children.

And, as for such worldly estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me with in this life, after my just debts and funeral charges be paid and satisfied, I give, devise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form.

Imprimis - I give to my son Myndert Wemple, deceased, his oldest son John Wemple, my small Island containing about 1 acre of land, situate, lying and being in the Township of Schenectady in the Mohawk River, on the south side of the foremost island as also my full, true and just Eighth part in the saw mill, Dam, Saws, Utensils and grounds and privileges to said mill belonging, situate, standing and being with the limits and bounds of the Township of Schenectady, on the east side of the Mohawk river, about 4 miles from Schenectady, north east on a certain creek called 'The Mill Creek.' To hold for him, the said John Wemple and his heirs an assigns forever, wherewith he must be satisfied and make no further pretense to any part of my estate for being my heir at law.

Item - I give my son Reyer Wemple and to his heirs and assigns I do give and devise all that my messsuge of tenement with Appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate, lying and being on the south side of the Mohawk River, in the limits and bounds of the town of Schenectady, in the County of Albany where he, the said Reyer, lived on so as it now belongs to me, commonly called Damhauer and Warmoes Gadt at a place called Woestine. To hold to him and my said son Reyer Wemple, his heirs and assigns forever.

Item - To my sons Isaac Wemple and Ephraim Wemple and to their heirs and assigns forever I do give and devise my westerly part of my Low arable land, being my great flats situate, lying and being on the south side of the Mohawk river, in the Mohawks country, lying to the west of my house and homestead where I now live and beginning by the cross fence which stands a little to the west of a small creek about 200 yards westerly up the river and so taking in all my arable land which lies to the west of the cross fence, being my great flats aforesaid. To hold them my said sons, Isaac Wemple and Ephraim Wemple, their heirs and assigns forever, to be equally divided and shared by them and among them share and share alike, to the one no more nor better thereof than to the other.

Item - To my son John Wemple, Jr. and to his heirs and assigns forever, I do give and devise my easterly part of arable low land, situate, lying and being on the south side of the Mohawk River, in the Mohawks country, lying to the east of my dwelling house and homestead beginning at the cross fence about 200 yards to the west of my said dwelling house, and so taking in my houses, barns, orchard, homestead, together with my arable land lying to the east of my said house called Robert En Haihge as also my island lying in the Mohawk river just opposite my house in the Mohawks country called 'island to hold to him, my son John Wempel his heirs and assigns forever.

To my three sons Isaac Wempel, Epharim Wempel and John Wempel, and to their heirs and assigns forever, I do give and devise all my woodland, pastures ground, and premises and appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate, lying and being in the Mohawks country, adjoining to the south of the low land and homestead herein about devised to them, to hold to them their heirs and assigns forever, all to be equally shared and divided by them, and among them, share and share alike to the one no more nor better than to the other.

To my loving wife Arejaentje Wempel, I do give and bequeath all the rest and residue of real estate all my Negro slaves young and old, all my household goods and furniture, linen and woolen bedding, palte, cattle, etc, during her widowhood for her maintenance and livelihood and immediately after my said wife Arejaentje decease, if she remains unmarried or immediately after her remarriage which shall happen first,

I do then devise and dispose of the same in manner and form following, to wit:
To my daughter Arejaentje, deceased her son Arent Bradt and her daughter Catollientje Bradt, children of Captain Andries Bradt, and to their heirs and assigns forever, I do give and devise two morgans of arable lowland, situate lying and being on an island which lies near the town of Schenectady to the bounds of said township to the west of side of the town, in the Mohawk river, on the southerly half of said island, is bounded west by two morgans of land, which I some time past conveyed to Widow van Driesen and north by the northerly half of the said island now belonging to Captain Jacobus Van Sleyck and south by the creek and so running along the said creek and partition of fence of Captain Jacobus Van Sleyck, easterly till it takes in the full quantity of two morgans (about 4 acres) of arable land to hold to them their heirs and assigns forever, all to be equally shared and divided by them and among them, share and share alike, to the one no more or better thereof than to the other.

Item. To my daughter, Maria Butler, the wife of Lieutenant Walter Butler, Jr. and to her heirs and assigns forever, I do give and devise two morgans of arable lowland situate lying and being in the bounds of the town of Schenectady on the above named island, on the south side thereof, bounded west by the two morgans of arable land herein above given and devised to my grandchildren Arent Brandt and Catolintje Brandt, children of my daughter Anjentje late deceased; as above state north by Captain Jacobus Van Sleyck above named and south by the creek and running so along the creek and the partition fence of Captain Jacobus Van Sleyck till it takes in the full quantity of two morgans of arable land, to have to her, my said daughter Maria, and to her heirs and assigns forever.

Item. To my daughter, Rebecca Coneyn, the wife of Peter Coneyn and to her heirs and assigns forever, I do devise two morgans of arable lowland situate, lying and being in the bounds of the town of Schenectady on the above island on the south thereto bounded west by two morgans of arable land herein above given and devised to my daughter, Maria, south by the creek, north by Captain Jacobus Van Sleyck as above named an so running along the creek and the partition fence of Captain Jacobus Van Sleyck till it takes in full quantity of two morgans of arable land, to hold to her my said daughter, Rebecca, and to her heirs and assigns forever.

Item. To my son Myndert Wempel deceased, his two sons, John Wempel and Myndert Wempel and to their heirs and assigns forever, I do give devise all the rest and residue of said island situate, lying and being in the bounds of the township of Schenectady just southwesterly of the said town, called the first or foremost island, bounded west by the two morgans of land herein last above given and devised to my daughter, Rebecca, south and east by the creek, north by Captain Jacobus Van Sleyck, as also my house and lot of ground lying in the town of Schenectady bounded east by the street, south by Daniel DeGraaf, north by the lot of Seymons Johan Veeder and west by the creek to held to them, their heirs & assigns forever, all to be equally shared and divided by them and among them, share and share alike, to the one no more nor better thereof than to the other.

Item. It is my will and I do order and direct my four sons to wit; Reyer Wempel, Isaac Wempel, Ephraim Wempel and John Wempel, or their heirs or assigns to pay or cause to be paid all my just debts and funeral charges, which I shall have paid at the time of my decease.

Item. It is my will and express order that if my two grandchildren herein above named John Wempel, and Myndert Wempel , sons of my son Myndert Wempel deceased, as above named do or shall happen to die without lawful issue of their body or bodies, Then what I have herein above given and devised him or them, so died as aforesaid with out lawful issue, shall descend and devolve on all my sons and daughters herein named equally and share and share and divide by them and among them, and share and share alike, to the one no more nor better thereof than to the others, anything herein contained to the contrary thereof not withstanding.

Item. It is my will if one or more of my three sons it wit; Isaac Wempel, Ephraim Wempel, or John Wempel shall die without lawful issue of his or their bodies that the survivor or survivors of my said three sons last named shall then have what I herein above have given & devised him or them so deceased as aforesaid, paying thereof in my just debts he or they so died without lawful issue was herein above directed and obliged to pay and perform.

I give and bequeath unto my son Isaac Wempel, my Negro boy named Caspel. I give and bequeath unto my son Ephraim Wempel, my Negro named Charles. I give and bequeath unto my son John Wemple, my Negro boy named Tobie. I give and bequeath unto my granddaughter, the daughter of my daughter, Arrantie wife of Captain Andries Bradt late deceased Catalientje, my Negro wench called Rood. I give and bequeath unto my daughter Deborah, the wife of Barent Wemple, my Negro wench named Hen. I give and bequeath unto my daughter Maria the wife of Lieutenant Walter Butler, my Negro wench named Saar. I give and bequeath unto my daughter Rebecca my Negro girl named Mary. I give and bequeath unto my son John Wempel, my Negro man named Ned and my Negro wench named Gin, he to pay therefor to my grandson Myndert Wempel, above named the sum of twenty pounds, current money of New York, seven years after my wife's decease. I give and bequeath unto my son Ephramim Wemple, my Negro man named Prince, he paying therefor my grandson, John Wempel about named the sum of twenty pounds current money of New York seven years after my wife's decease.

Lastly, I make and ordain my brother Jacob Glen and my good friend Robert Sanders Executers of this my last will and testament, and do desire them to execute the same for me according to my true intention and meaning. Lastly I do hereby disannul and revoke all former wills by before this time made, willing that this and no other heretofore made to be my last will and testament.

In witness whereof I the said Jan Wempel have to this my last will and testament set my hand and seal the day and year first above written.


The following is from a manuscript sent to the compiler on September 28, 2000 by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI. This manuscript was written by William Barent Wemple, compiler of the first part if this genealogy from 1885-1913. The manuscript was never published.

Johannes Wemp was born in Schenectady about 1675 but now document can now be found which definitely gives the date, because the church records as well as nearly all other papers were lost in the destruction of Schenectady on Feb. 9 1689/90.

At the time of this occurrence, Jan was captured and taken to Canada as a prisoner, along with two of his father's slaves. An official report of the attack and its result was made to the Alderman of Albany which mentions Jan Wemp, son of Myndert Wemp, with two negers as among those made prisoners. This report is bound in a book entitled MORTGAGE BOOK, 1753-1765, in the Albany County Clerk's office and is included in the minutes of that date.

Jan was finally restored to liberty and returned to his home but just how long he was retained as a prisoner is not known.

Notwithstanding the loss of his birth record and his subsequent capture, there is no trouble to easily prove the Jan Wemp, who for so many years occupied such a prominent and influential position on the Mohawk Valley and was the owner of a great deal of very valuable land, to the son of Myndert Janse Wemp and the person claimed.

His father, as has been elsewhere shown, was one of the original trustees of the Schenectady Patent, by virtue of the Dongan grant made Nov. 1, 1684, and upon Myndert's death in 1690 his son Jan acted in his stead. as soon as the law would permit, in the capacity of eldest son and heir,in all matters concerning the administration of the affairs relating to the Patent. In DEEDS D-No. 4, Albany County Clerk's office, is recorded a conveyance dated Feb. 27,1689/90. wherein Jan Myndertse Wemp, son of Myndert Wemp, deceased, unites with the other trustees of the Schenectady Patent in granting to Gysbert Marceelis some islands in the Mohawk river at Schenectady. Although the body of the deed mentions him as Jan Myndertse Wemp he signs it simply as Jan Wemp and which was ever his customary signature, with two exceptions.

In the same office, a similar deed in recorded in DEEDS E-No. 5 -DEEDS AND WILLS 2, on page 106, dated June 3, 1701, which reads as follows:

TO ALL CHRISTIAN PEOPLE to whom the present writing shall come Reyer Schermerhorn, Jan Baptist Van Eps, eldest son of Jan Van Eps deceased, and Jan Wemp, eldest son of Myndert Wemp, deceased on behalfe of the Town of Schanegtde & places adjacent, Trustees, Seneth Greeting, Whereas Pynier Schaets was heretofore in his live time in peaceable possession of a certain Lott of ground at Schanegtade town aforesaid whereof as yet no Patent nor Transport on the name of s'd Ryer Shaets can be found, so that we can believe the writeings thereof among others were burned when the french of Canada distoryed s'd town of the 9th day of Feb. 1689/90 and whereas the s'd lott afterwards was sold by Gideon Schaets, eldest son of Rynier Schaets Dec'd., to Albert Ffedder, who now desires that the same may be conveyed to s'd Ffedder, KNOW YEE that we the said Ryer Schermerhorn, Jan Baptist Van Eps and Jan Wemp, on the behalf as afores'd, having by virtue of the generall patent granted by governor Tho: DDongan, the first day of November 1684, conveyed, transported & confirmed into s'd Albert Vedder. . . .

On 11th October, 1711, he and four others made a contract with Governor Hunter for the erection of two forts --- one at Fort Hunter (named in honor of the governor), the other at Onondage; the were to be completed by July 1, 1713 and the price stipulated was was 1000 pounds. The Chapel which they built within the enclosure of Fort Hunter was the famous QUEEN ANNE'S CHAPEL renounced in local history. The original contract is preserved in Volume 56, page 124, of COLONIAL MANUSCRIPTS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, State Library, Albany.

According to the roster of Captain Johannes Sanders Glen's company of Schenectady in 1715, contained in volume 60, page 53, of COLONIAL MANUSCRIPTS, above mentioned, he was the Lieutenant of the company and he signs the return certifying to its correctness (for certified copy see document No. 66). . . .

A list of Freeholders of the City and County of Albany, dated May 22, 1733 preserved in volume 70, page 58 COLONIAL MANUSCRIPTS, . . . enumerates him as a freeholder living in Schenectady. This was only a few months prior to his being a resident of the Mohawks County, as already shown in mention of deed dated September 24, 1733, so it must have been between these two dates that he removed to the latter locality.

He was on of the very earliest residents of Montgomery County, of the Mohawks Country as it was then called.

August 5, 1736, he petitions for a license to purchase a tract of land from the Indians, lying on the south side of the Mohawk River, beginning by a certain rock called Astaghrogon by the native Indians, on the bank of the said river,containing about 540 acres, also three small islands in said river opposite the land of Wouter Swart, containing together about fourteen acres. (LAND PAPERS, volume 12, page 38, Secretary of State's office, Albany.)

He at once moved upon this property and resided upon it the remainder of his life-time, in his will devising it ot his children, who have successively handed it down, a portion sill being held by his descendants and occupied by them to the present day. . . .

The original will of Ryer Schemerhorn is on file in the office of the Clerk of the Court of Appeals, Albany, NY and a portion relating to Jan Wemp's three children by Catalina Schermerhorn is quoted below:

Item, From and after the determination of the said estate to my wife as above said, I give and devise to my said eldest son, John Schermerhorne and his heirs and assigns forever all my reale estate, lands, tenements and herditaments where I now live in Schenectady, Provided allways and it is my true intent and meaning that if my said son John Schermerhorne doth possess and enjoy the aforesaid estate of the aforesaid devise made unto him. then and in such case he may said son John Schermerhorne shall transport and convey and confirme into John Wemp's three children, Myndert, Reyert and Ariaentje, procreated on the body of my deceised daughter Cataline late wife of John Wemp, and their heirs and assigns forever, the one half or morjety of the house and land where he my said son John now lives on the north side of the Maques River, above the Town of Schonectady, and the other half to my daughter Janneke, wife of Volkert Symononsen, and her heirs and assigns forever otherwise the aforesaid gift an devise to my said son John and his heirs and assigns to be utterly void and none effect. 
WEMPLE, Johannes Myndert (I433)
 
52 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. SHARLOW, Carolyn Carrie (I12570)
 
53 Augustus D'Arcy VanBokkelen was born in Aug 1885 in Chicago, IL, USA. He died in Dec 1955 in Los Angeles, CA, USA. He was an importer/exporter of fruits & vegetables (Vanbo Brand) with Libertus 1920s to 1929 in New York, Los Angeles, Buenos Aires, Santiago. He was also known as D'Arcy. He was married to Carolyn Glen on 19 Aug 1921 in New York, NY, USA. James Boyd Van Bokkelen VAN BOKKELEN, Augustus D'Arcy (I12078)
 
54 Bakersfield Californian, The (CA) - October 11, 2003 Deceased Name: Vernon Lee Wemple Vernon Lee Wemple, 70, Rosamond, Oct. 8 in Lancaster. Visitation 7 to 9 p.m. Oct. 16, service 10:30 a.m. Oct. 17, Masonic Lodge, Rosamond. Wood Family Funeral Service. WEMPLE, Vernon Lee (I6345)
 
55 Battle Creek Enquirer (MI) - July 15, 2004

Deceased Name: David E. Wemple

9:30 a.m. Thursday, July 15, at Richard A. Henry Funeral Home. 
WEMPLE, David Edwin (I7620)
 
56 Biography written by her granddaughter, Lois Wemple Reichbach, and forwarded to the compiler, on August 31,1996:

(Aline) was brought up to be a lady in the classic Southern tradition, her education included such necessary skills as painting porcelain and embroidering linen. Her family had migrated to Texas from Virginia and had played a role in Texas' fight for independence. Her father became a judge, contributed to the writing of the state's constitution, and the town of Ledbetter, Texas, got its name from her family.
Her marriage was arranged to join her family, with its sense of the contribution made on Southern soil through several generations, with the family of Edwin Cassius Wemple which had played an important role in New York state and Boston (the Copleys of Boston being in the line) since the early 1600's.
Unfortunately, Edwin was a ladies man who fathered a child outside of the marriage, so Aline divorced him. His parents raised his and Aline's son throughout Edwin Copley's childhood while their son, Edwin Cassius, busied himself with a succession of marriages and divorces. Aline felt shamed and never did return to her parents' home. Instead, her father arranged for her to live with a long time family friend, Dr. Sidney Beauvais of Washington, D.C., where Aline more than repaid his kindness by serving as manager of his household, hostess when he entertained, and even as his driver. She was one of the first women in the country to get a driver's license. Dr. Beauvais wanted to marry Aline, but she had been brought up in a world in which people were expected to marry only once, unless widowed, so she declined his offer.

Some time during her years in Dr. Beauvais' home in Washington, her son came to live with her and she assumed the responsibility of raising the boy herself, something for which her upbringing, with maids and nannies, and her guilt over having abandoned him, did not prepare her adequately. Upon the good surgeon's death, he left a small sum to Aline, the bulk of his estate going to the woman he eventually did marry.

Aline also got a small inheritance from her family, so when the stock market crashed in 1929, she proved how shrewd and capable a lady of breeding could be when she had to provide for herself and her son. Aline was in a cash position with her money, so she did just the opposite of what most people did; she bought all of the stocks she could, and all at bargain prices. She became quite wealthy. When her son went off to college, she left Washington and took up residence on the property of relatives, the Randolphs, in Virginia, (they pointed with pride to their connection with Thomas Jefferson, who married a Randolph). She lived in a building on the estate which had been a slave's cabin in the past, while she had a copy of an historical house built on Winston Terrace in Charlottesville, Virginia. That is where she spent the rest of her life.

A good portion of her wealth was spent on her son, Edwin Copley Wemple, whom she hoped to groom as a proper Southern gentleman, proud of his remarkable ancestry. He, however, proved to be a rebellious and self-destructive individual who did little with his education, which included William and Mary College, the University of Virginia and a Ph D in History from Harvard. Aline also bailed Ed out of various expensive jams, which included a generous settlement when he divorced his third wife, Helen. Aline financed projects on which he embarked, such as the English language magazine MEXICO TODAY, which he and his first wife published in Old Mexico and distributed free of charge to subscribers as far away as Washington, D.C., for at least two years. In the end, Ed came home to his mother and lived with her for at least ten years, up until her death, where she supported him.

During her years in Virginia, she took great pleasure in her magnificent garden, in following the stock market, and in supporting the University of Virginia, where she was treated with great respect because of her ties to the Randolphs and ultimately to Jefferson. When she died, she left a Spendthrift Trust which is designed to provide income to three generations, then to be dissolved. If there are no descendants at that time, the money will go to her beloved University of Virginia. 
LEDBETTER, Aline (I6600)
 
57 Birth unknown; removed from Maryland to Schenectady, NY, 1759; m. Helena, daughter of Andries A. Bratt and Elizabeth Wemple, November 4, 1765; she was baptized July 14,1745; was large property owner at Fonda, NY, where be became an early settler; in (the) Revolution; was (a) Captain in Col. F. Fisher's Reg., but became a Loyalist, fled to Canada leaving his family behind and was a Lieutenant in Butler's Rangers, and his property here was confiscated; did not return to the U.S., . . . WBW

The following is from a manuscript sent to the compiler on September 28, 2000 by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI. This manuscript was written by William Barent Wemple, compiler of the first part if this genealogy from 1885-1913. The manuscript was never published.

One of his descendants has furnished the following:

Andries Wemple is termed in the history of the Wemples as being an adherent of the King, in the Revolutionary War, and his property was confiscated. The true history of him is as follows, he was a captain of a troop, as they called it in those days, serving under Sir. Wm. Johnson during the French and Indian Wars and until the breaking out of the Revolutionary War, he was in continuous intercourse with Sir Wm. Johnson up to the point of the latter's death and afterwards with Sir John Johnson, the son, being an officer under both of these men. It can be readily seen why he followed the advice of Sir John Johnson and went with him and his party to Canada. Sir John told him that the outbreak would be of short duration, and if he allowed himself to be mixed up with it, his property would be confiscated by the King after the Rebellion was suppressed, therefore, he, with most of the others who had served previously under the Johnsons, accompanied Sir John to Canada, first having sent his wife and children to Chrisopher Yates, her brother-in-law, in Schenectady, who reared her entire family along with his own.

It was afterwards known to his family that upon arriving in Canada, he and some others who went with him were much dissatisfied with their position and condition. Andries fought a duel with a British officer who cast reflections on the military courage of the Dutch whigs, including General Philip Schuyler; shortly after this he, with a party of others, attempted to return home but all are supposed to have been massacred, for not one of them was ever heard from again. His wife died broken-hearted.

He was a large land owner and farmer. The homestead built by him, with its large elms which he set out, still stands being latterly know as the James Lansing property about half way between Caughnawaga, on the Mohawk and Johnstown. In olden times his property joined that of Sir Wm. Johnson's.

Prior to his removal to Canada he was, during the early part of the Revolutionary War, a captain in the Tryon County Militia under Colonel Fred'k Fisher. . . .

The article A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE THIRD BATTALION by James F. Morrison was sent to me by William W. Wemple of Newport, OR via internet on October 30, 2000. The following is an excerpt from that article:

. . . On May 15th, 1780, Captain Andrew Wemple with several men in his company
deserted from the Third Battalion and fled to Canada in the wake of an
invasion soon to be launched by Colonel Sir John Johnson from Canada into
the Mohawk Valley. . . . 
WEMPLE, Andrew (I474)
 
58 Both are buried down the road (Hwy. 158) west of their home in the Old Daniel Gwyn Cemetery (Dorothy's grandfather's land) 200 yards across the field at the edge of the woods. Family F732
 
59 Bought 160 acres of land for $600.00 in Mansfield, Louisana about 1850. March 14, 1863 promoted from lieutenant to captain in Confederate Army. Served at the siege of Vicksburg against U.S. Grant. He was never married. WEMPLE, John Loucks (I2469)
 
60 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. ESTES, Brandt Stewart Peter (I12235)
 
61 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F3622
 
62 Buffalo News, The (NY) - April 3, 1997 Deceased Name: PATRICIA A. WEMPLE

Patricia A. Wemple, 56, a former resident of Lockport and Burt, died Monday (March 31, 1997) in her Largo, Fla., home after a lengthy illness.

A native of the Town of Somerset, the former Patricia Ferington worked for the Harrison Division of General Motors for 27 years, retiring in 1991

A graduate of DeSales High School, she was a member of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church.

Surviving are her husband, Robert F. Wemple Sr.; her parents, Raymond and Mary Verguson Ferington; two stepsons, Steven and Robert F. Jr., both of Hendersonville, Tenn.; two stepdaughters, Darlene Herberger and Laura Rutland, both of Newfane; two brothers, Raymond Ferington and Brian Ferington; a sister, Rogene Weaver of Lockport; and 11 stepgrandchildren.

A Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at 11 a.m. Saturday in St. John the Baptist Church, 168 Chestnut St. 
FERINGTON, Patricia Ann (I8696)
 
63 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. ACRE, Carol Ann (I8787)
 
64 Cause of death: Hepatic failure.
Medical information: Diagnosed with colon cancer and had a colostomy. Seven years later the cancer came back in her liver and she died 11 months later. 
BRATTON, Eva Mary (I12629)
 
65 Cause of death: Kidney failure.
Medical information: Diebetic. 
COBINE, Alice (I12627)
 
66 Cause of death: Stomach cancer WEMPLE, Marjory (I2417)
 
67 Cause of Death: Tuberculosis WEMPLE, Gail Hamilton (I3155)
 
68 Chicago Sun-Times (IL) - July 30, 1996 Deceased Name: Ann Wemple Henry, sculptor, painter

Ann Wemple Henry, 77, a sculptor and painter, died Saturday at University of Chicago Hospitals.

Mrs. Henry, a Flossmoor resident, was active in the Women's Board of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Fortnightly Club of Chicago and the Flossmoor Service League.

She was born in St. Louis, and her family moved to Chicago when she was a child. She graduated from University of Chicago High School and Wellesley College in Wellesley, Mass., and earned a master's degree in history from the University of Chicago.

She is survived by her husband, Richard V. Henry Jr., and seven nieces and nephews.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. today at the Church of St. John the Evangelist, Park Drive and Leavitt Avenue in Flossmoor. 
WEMPLE, Ann (I4203)
 
69 Chico Enterprise-Record (Chico, CA) - March 20, 2004

Deceased Name: WEMPLE Jackuline Wemple WEMPLE Jackuline Wemple, 65, of Paradise, died Friday, March 19, 2004, in Paradise. Arrangements are under the direction of Paradise Chapel of the Pines, 877-4991. 
OSTRAND, Jackuline Jean (I963)
 
70 Chico ENTERPRISE-RECORD, Wednesday December 29, 1999:

A memorial service for Donald H. 'Don' Heffren, 50, of Chico will be 3 p.m. Thursday December 30, 1999 in the Commercial Building at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds.

He died Sunday, December 26, 1999 at Buck's Lake.

He was born May 10, 1949, to Kenneth and Martha Heffren in Auburn. He graduated from Auburn High School and Sierra Junior College. In 1972 he received a degree in animal science from Chico State University.

In August of 1972, he wed Cindy L. Wemple in Yreka.

For the past 25 years, he was ranch manager for Gorrill Ranch.

Heffren was a member of the Farm Bureau, a 16-year member of the Western Canal Water District, former president of the Sutter Basin Water Association, member of the Butte Creek Watershed Conservancy, Five States Rice Marketing Association, Rice Milling Association, Chico Chamber of Commerce, and was president of the Butte United Soccer Club and the Butte Youth Soccer League. He was also a member of the Butte Meadows Hill Sliders Snowmobile Club, and Buck's Lake Snow Drifters Snowmobile Club.

He enjoyed the outdoors and outdoor sports, including scuba diving, snowmobile riding, water skiing, and snow skiing, and he loved spending time with family and friends.

Heffren was active in the community and was instrumental in the grading and preparation of the land for the 20th Street Park, Emma Wilson School playground, and in the reconstruction of the Chico athletic field.

Survivors include his wife Cindy of Chico; two sons, Frank of Salinas, and Joel of Sonoma; his father, Ken of Auburn; and a sister Claire Hile of Fresno.

Memorial Contributions may be made to Alpha Gamma Rho, Chi Chapter of San Luis Obispo, or Sonoma State Men's Soccer in care of Brusie Funeral Home which is handling the arrangements.

Front page article from the ENTERPRISE-RECORD, Wednesday December 29, 1999:

EVENING OUTING ENDED IN AG LEADER'S DEATH

QUINCY -- An after dusk snowmobile outing of family and friends in the Plumas County high country lead to the death of local ranch manager Don Heffren, the California Highway Patrol in Quincy reported.

A Plumas County sheriff's sergeant pronounced Heffren, 50, dead at the scene of the 5:45 p.m. Sunday accident of a U.S. Forest Service road near Buck's Lake, which is dedicated to winter use as a snowmobile trail.

Heffren, riding solo, rounded a curve in the 12- to 15-foot wide trail and struck a tree stump withe the right skid of the machine, CHP officer James Stowe said.

Heffren catapulted from the snowmobile into a tree. According to Plumas County Sheriff-Coroner Len Gardner, Heffern possible suffered a broken neck.

The rancher was wearing a helmet and full face mask at he time of the accident, the CHP reported.

My preliminary finding is the snowmobile was traveling too fast for conditions, Stowe said. Drivers of off-road vehicles are under the same obligation as drivers of motor vehicles to operate their vehicles in a safe manner, he added.

Heffern was probably traveling between 40 and 50 mph when the snowmobile hit the stump and crashed. That speed estimate was based on interviews with John Shepherd, a Heffren friend, and other members of the ill-fated snowmobiling party.

It appeared the group was returning to the Heffren family cabin at Buck's Lake about ten miles west of Quincy, he added.

According to the officer, Heffren's party had departed from the cabin late in the day to take the trail, known by locals as Summit Road, to a remote overlook above the lake.


They said they had gone up there to look at the Chico and Oroville city lights. They intended to be out after dark, Stowe said.

He said the well-used snowmobile trail lacked fresh snow and was covered with a foot-thick pack of snow and some ice.

There were no direct witnesses to the accident.

Either Shepherd or Heffren's son, Frank, came around the curve a few seconds after the crash and found the fatally injured rancher next to the tree with the snowmobile off to the side.

Apparently the snowmobile drifted to the east edge of the trail where the skid plunged into a partially rotted stump sticking about one foot to 18 inches above the ground, Stowe reported.

Gardner, the Plumas County Sheriff, said Frank Heffren performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation of 15 or 20 minutes in an unsuccessful effort to revive his father. He reportedly failed to get any response.

Members of the snowmobile party finally make it to a telephone and contacted the sheriff's office at 6:46 p.m., about one hour after the accident.

Sheriff's Sgt. Thomas Mareina traveled to the scene on a snowmobile and pronounced Heffren dead.

Stowe said Heffren was regarded as an experienced snowmobile operator. He said the machine was legally registered and in good working condition, including its headlight.

After authorities released the snowmobile, it was started immediately by a friend or family member and driven away.

Though darkness had settled over the mountain, the weather was clear and visibility was good, Stowe said.

Gardner said an autopsy will be performed 'soon' to determine with exact cause of death.

Plumas County does not have a full-time or contract pathologist which forces the county to send death victims to Reno for post mortem examination. Heffren's blood will be sampled for the presence of drugs or alcohol, which is standard protocol at autopsies.

CHP officer Stowe said he was told alcohol was consumed on the vista point; however, he does not suspect Heffren was intoxicated at the time of the crash.

A memorial service will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday in the Commercial Building of the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds.

Compiler's Note: My wife and I attended this funeral, and it was, by far, the largest funeral we have ever attended. A good guess would conservatively put the number conservatively in attendance at over 1,000 persons. DRW

An article from the ENTERPRISE-RECORD dated Sunday, October 22, 2000, p. 1 c. 5:

MONUMENT AT PARK HONORS DON HEFFREN
by Jamie Trump, staff writer

Many people remember Don Heffren being highly involved with Chico's youth sports. And now, the new field at Community Park will serve as a reminder.

A memorial to Don Heffren was dedicated Saturday at the park off 20th Street. Nearly a hundred of his friends, family and community residents gathered to remember his life and watch as the Chico Area Recreation and Park District named six acres of new parkland after him.

CARD general manager Bill Kehoe and director Andy Holcombe unveiled a 7-foot-tall monument marking Don Heffren Field, For his active support and dedication to Chico's youth sports.

Only 50-year-old, Heffren was killed in a snowmobile accident near Buck's Lake in December 1999. He not only volunteered with Butte United Soccer and the Chico Youth Soccer League, but also did volunteer work on parks in the area, Kehoe said. He did the rough grading on the field named for him.

He was really involved, said Kehoe. We see him as a person who really helped out. He really helped in youth soccer. (His death) is a large loss to the community.

Chico Youth Soccer League representative Fred Reichel said that although naming the field was a great way to remember Heffren, the young kids playing soccer at the park are what Heffren should really be remembered by.

The memorial's not completely done. Because of rain delay, the brick facing was not finished.

Kehoe said 12 or 15 different organizations and people that donated money to help set up the park - including the Chico Youth Soccer League which donated $15,000 last year - will have their names engraved on one of the bricks used.

The memorial should be completed next week.

We're willing to take as many donations as we can, said Kehoe. He was a very special person.

To finish the dedication, Heffren's youngest son (Joel) kicked a soccer ball into the field, making at the first ball in the official Don Heffren Field. 
HEFFREN, Donald Hiram (I1097)
 
71 Committed suicide by shooting himself due to ill health. He was a particle board mill superintendent. DRW

Obituary from the Susanville LASSEN COUNTY TIMES, Tuesday, 31 July 1990, page 7Cc3-4:

PAUL LEROY HUNT

Paul Leroy Hunt, 75, died July 15, 1990, in Mifford. He was born March 18, 1915, in Salem, IL, and lived in Lassen County for 60 years coming from southern California.

Survivors include his wife, Vivian Mary Hunt, of Milford; son, Scott Hunt, of Cornwall-On-Hudson, NY; daughter, Claudia Oliver, of Eureka, sister, Bernice Grismore of San Jose; and eight grandchildren.

Memorial services were held July 19, 1990, at Lucero-Carlson Colonial Mortuary Chapel. 
HUNT, Paul Leroy (I23)
 
72 Compiler's Note: Marjel was a faithful friend when I needed a friend. I shall ever be grateful to her. DRW WEMPLE, Marjel May (I8)
 
73 Copy of letter written to Olive Boylan, Historian of Town of Stockbridge and Village of Munnsville, New York. 13409 and she forwarded it to the compiler: DRW

Oct 4, 1992

Historian Olive Boylan
Munnsville, NY 13409

Dear Ms Boylan:

Enclosed find the promised Wemple Genealogy which I obtained form the Montgomery County Department of History and Archives.

Ms. Vi Fallone, Montgomery County Historian, told me that Mr. William Barent Wemple, Sr. spent 30 years compiling his genealogy. He was owner and publisher of the Mohawk Valley Democrat newspaper; that he died rather young (in his fifties); left the newspaper to his son, Wm. Barent Wemple Jr., who died 8 or 9 years ago. The newspaper is no longer in business.

(Signed) Robert Jackson
165 A Hague Boulevard
Glenmont, NY 12077

The following is from an unpublished manuscript, written by William Barent Wemple II, compiler of the first part of this genealogy from 1885-1913, sent to the compiler on September 28, 2000 by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI.

William Barent Wemple was born in Fultonville, Montgomery County in New York, on the 29th day of September 1866. He attended the public schools in that place until March, 1881, when he entered Clinton Liberal Institute, in Fort Plain, NY, and pursued an academic course until June, 1883. In September, 1883, he entered Union College, with the intention of taking a four year scientific course but just then the college was passing through a very critical period in its existence, and he deemed it for his best interests to leave, more especially as his predilection was from mingling with the commercial world and facing life's stern realities in the shape of earning his own livelihood, which he very early manifested a desire to do. He consequently decided in March, 1884, to accept a clerical position in the office of Wm. B. Wemple's Sons, who were continuing in the conduct of the foundry business in Fultonville, NY, which had been established and most successfully carried on by the grandfather of the subject of this sketch. He was in charge of the general office, with this firm, for over seven years. In December, 1891, he severed his connection with them to accept the very responsible position of auditor in the office of (text missing) . . . duties . . . satisfaction . . . himself. By reason of his position, it was necessary for him to pass upon and audit bills against the State amounting to several millions of dollars each year.

In January of, 1898, he was chosen as Superintendent of the Albany Hospital, by its Board of Governors and was, therefore, obliged to resign his position with the State, much to the regret of the Comptroller. The hospital authorities erected a beautiful new plant of eight detached and spacious buildings, connected by corridors, in the south-western part of the city, in 1898, and he was the first superintendent of the new hospital.

While in Clinton Liberal Institute he associated himself the the Wm. Cullen Bryant debating society; in Union College he became a member of the Sigma Phi fraternity and afterwards a member of the Sigma Phi corporation and Union College Alumni association.

As soon as he attained his majority, he made application to the Fultonville Lodge No. 531, for the first three degrees in Freemasonry, which body elected him on November 16, 1887 and conferred the third of Master Mason degree upon him January 8, 1888. From here he passed rapidly on up through the higher orders of Masonry and belongs to Johnson Chapter No. 78; De Witt Clinton Council No. 22; Holy Cross Commandery No. 51; Cypress Temple of the Mystic Shrine; Albany Sovereign Consistory of the 32nd degree.

He was elected Junior (test missing) . . . No. 531, F. & A. M. for the years 1889 and 1890 and was elected to Worshipful Master for 1891 and 1892. He was unanimously re-elected for the next year but owning to his business being located in Albany, it was impossible for him to devote the necessary time and attention, therefore he was obliged ot decline the honor. The last year he presided over the Lodge was the most successful in its history and was made memorial by the immense increase in membership and a great revival in interest in things Masonic. It was a phenomenal year for the Lodge and will long be remembered as the banner year. As a substantial token of their deep appreciation for the hard work performed by their Master, they presented him with a beautiful gold Past Master's jewel. Just at this time it was fully understood that the Grand Master of Masons in the State of New York had concluded to appoint him a Deputy Grand Master for the old fourteenth Masonic district but his removal from the district on account of business, prevented the accomplishment of a cherished wish. He was appointed Assistant Grand Lecturer, for the fourth judicial district in 1892.

On June 15, 1892, he was married by the Reverand John A. De Baun, of Fonda, NY, pastor of the Dutch Reformed Church, to Gertrude Lillian Berry, daughter of John Darius Berry and Lillian Gertrude Lipe; his wife was born July 31, 1872 in (text missing) . . . . 
WEMPLE, William Barent (I3722)
 
74 D'Arcy Glen VanBokkelen was born on 9 Jun 1923 in New York, NY, USA. He graduated in Jun 1940 in Newburyport High School, Newburyport, MA, USA. He received a degree in Bachelor of Arts in Government in 1944 in Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA. He died on 19 Nov 1997 in Newburyport, MA, USA. Cardiac arrest, about 1630. He was an editor 1945 through early 1970s in Time-Life NY, NY, Houghton-Mifflin, Boston, MA. He was living Jun 1961 - present in 249 High St., Newburyport, MA, USA. To California 1926? Lived on Beachwood Dr, then Bronson Ct.. Back to Newburyport, lived at Miss Marr's (teacher in Davenport School). Carolyn packing goods from house on Ocean Ave., that had come down from Seneca Falls. Then to St. George Hotel in Brooklyn. Then to California, then back again when Bert (Libertus) died (1929). Was living in the St. George Hotel when Edison died, recalled all the lights being dimmed. He was married to Louise Brink Robinson on 20 Jul 1951 in Municipal Building, New York, NY, USA. James Boyd Van Bokkelen
 
VAN BOKKELEN, D'Arcy Glen (I12079)
 
75 Dan sold cars for Barron Chevrolet for many years. He was well respected by the community. DRW

Obituary from the Susanville LASSEN ADVOCATE, 27 October 1980, page 3c3:

LYLE E. WEMPLE

Funeral services for Lyle E. Wemple, 80, who died in Reno on Saturday, will be held at the Lucero-Carlson Mortuary on Tuesday at 1 p.m. with interment to follow in the Milford Cemetery.

The deceased was born in Milford on August 4, 1900, the son of N.V. and Pearl Bronson Wemple and had resided in Lassen County all of his life. He was employed as an automobile salesman for Barron Chevrolet for 37 years. He was a 54 year member of Susanville Elks Lodge 1487 and a member of the Lassen County Sheriff's Posse and Lassen Lodge 147, F. & A.M. (Free and Accepted Masons).

Survivors include his wife, Nadene of Susanville, a son, Dana Wemple, Burlingame; a brother, Guy Wemple, Fallon, Nevada; a sister Bernice Crutcher, Applegate, California, and three grandchildren, Timothy, Lynn and Beth Wemple of Burlingame. 
WEMPLE, Lyle Elmer (I189)
 
76 Daughters of the American Revolution #127957. DEWITT, Mary (I12378)
 
77 Daytona Beach News-Journal (FL) - May 13, 1997 Deceased Name: Evelyn Wemple

EDGEWATER -- Evelyn Wemple, 78, of South Ridgewood Avenue, a waitress for the Chatterbox Social Club in New York before her retirement, died Saturday at Vencor Hospital North Florida, Green Cove Springs.

Mrs. Wemple was born in Rochester, N.Y., and came here in 1984 from Rochester, N.Y. She was a member of Christ Community Church and the Elks Club Auxiliary, both in New Smyrna Beach.

Survivors include two sons, Robert, New Smyrna Beach, and William, Edgewater; three sisters, Doris Brown, Williamson, N.Y., and Mary Selover and Helen Vandenburg, both of Rochester; two brothers, Levern Stonegraber and Robert Stonegraber, both of Rochester; six grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. Baldwin-Hughey, New Smyrna Beach, is in charge. 
STONEGRABER, Evelyn Ester (I6849)
 
78 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. WEMPLE, Debra Susan (I35)
 
79 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. WEMPLE, Debra Lynn (I6801)
 
80 Deceased Name: Wemple -- SHELBYVILLE - Julia D. Wemple

41, Shelbyville, Pentecostal Church missionary and pastor, died Wednesday (Feb. 11, 1998). Survivors: mother and stepfather, Cynthia and William Miller, Pana; father, Robert Wemple, Shelbyville; grandmother, Hilda Wemple, Hammond, Ind.; brothers, Tony Miller, Jefferson City, Mo.; Jim Wemple, Tower Hill; Jeff Wemple, Washington state; John Wemple, Texas; sisters, Dorothy Hodge, Effingham; Pam Tull, Mattoon; Beth Hughes, Alaska. Preceded by: one sister.

Graveside services: 2 p.m. Friday, Glenwood Cemetery, Shelbyville. Visitation: one hour before services, Lockart & Sons Funeral Home, Shelbyville. Memorials: Lincolnland Visiting Nurse Association. 
WEMPLE, Julia Diane (I8637)
 
81 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. SHARLOW, David Lee (I12569)
 
82 Denver Post, The (CO) - May 7, 1996 Deceased Name: Raymond H. Wemple -- Meat industry worker, 82 Raymond H. Wemple of Denver, a retired meat industry worker, died April 3. He was 82.

Services were April 9 at Olinger Moore Howard Mortuary. Interment was in Crown Hill Cemetery.

He was born Nov. 23, 1913, in Denver. On Oct. 17, 1935, he married Esther Babcock.

Wemple graduated from Manual High School. He retired from the meat industry after 58 years.

He was a member of the Bailey Mountain Lions Club, Windsor Gardens Noon Optimist and Windsor Gardens Men's Golf.

He is survived by his wife; two daughters, Norma Crowell, Honolulu, and Carol Nauert, Austin, Texas; and three grandsons. 
WEMPLE, Raymond Howard (I4186)
 
83 Died in a farm tractor accident. It turned over on her and pinned her under it in an irrigation cannel causing her to drown. DRW Rest in peace, sweet Neice.

Obituary from the Susanville LASSEN ADVOCATE, Friday, 9 May 1980, page 1c1-2:

JANICE McCLELLAND KILLED IN ACCIDENT

Janice McClelland, a 17-year-old Lassen High School Senior, was killed Wednesday evening when a tractor she was driving fell into an irrigation ditch on a Standish ranch, pinning her under water.

The accident occurred at about 7 p.m., according to the Lassen County Coroner's Office. She was pronounced dead at the scene. Witnesses said the tractor rolled over into the water when the ground near the bank collapsed. Bystanders were reportedly unable to push the machine off the girl.

McClelland was active in 4-H projects and was a member of the Future Farmers of America at the Lassen High School. She was also a member of the Honey Lake Valley Riders group and served last year as queen of the Lassen County Junior Rodeo. She was a lifelong resident of Standish.

She is survived by her parents, Tom and Donna McClelland and two sisters, all of Standish and grandparents, also of the area. 
MCCLELLAND, Janice Marie (I162)
 
84 Died of injuries sustained when he was struck by a Gloversville police patrol car while crossing the street in an intersection (at age 84).

He was a member of the Fremont Methodist Church and he first settled in Johnstown, NY where he operated an ice cream and confectionery business at 201 North Ferry Street. About 1914 he moved to Gloversville where he lived in retirement, with his daughter at 138 Kingsboro Avenue. 
WEMPLE, James H. (I3078)
 
85 Don was a rancher in Milford, CA. He enjoyed chewing tobacco, visiting, riding horses and working cattle, just possibly in that order. DRW

Obituary from the Susanville LASSEN COUNTY TIMES, Tuesday, 16 April 1991, page 1c4-6:

AREA RANCHER DIED SUDDENLY

Lifelong Milford resident Donald J. Don Wemple died at his home in Milford April 12. As of press time, no cause of death was immediately known.

The death of Wemple came unexpectedly and within weeks of Joe Roberts, another long time Milford resident and neighbor of Wemple.

He was born in Susanville, September 16, 1917, and worked on the family ranch for 44 years. The Wemple family settled in the Honey Lake Valley in the late 1800's.

Among Wemple's many associations were the Lassen County Cattlemen's Association, the Farm Bureau, the Lassen County Sheriff's Posse, and the Plumas Sierra Rural Electric Board.

Survivors include his wife, the former Gay Corder, son Ken of Milford and daughter Donna McClelland of Standish, his father Claude Wemple of Milford, brothers Glenn of Milford and David of Orland, four grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

Services were scheduled for April 15 at Lucero Carlson Mortuary Chapel with burial at the Milford Cemetery. 
WEMPLE, Donald Jay (I15)
 
86 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. WEMPLE, Robert Preston (I6287)
 
87 During the Revolution, he was senior surgeon, general hospital, Northern Department, and was also in the Fifth (Spencer's) NJ Battalion; settled in Claverack, NY and practiced his profession; was the Treasure of Columbia Company for several years, and a prominent man; May 1, 1767, he was a private in Captain Abraham Cuyler's Grenadier Company of Albany County Militia. WBW

The following is from a manuscript sent to the compiler on September 28, 2000 by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI. This manuscript was written by William Barent Wemple, compiler of the first part if this genealogy from 1885-1913. The manuscript was never published.


He was baptized in Schenectady, March 10, 1751. Was Senior Surgeon General, General Hospital, North Department, during the Revolutionary War. Was in Spencer's, also called the Fifth New Jersey Battalion and was credited to New York State (FERNOWS COLONIAL HISTORY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, volume 15, page 247).

The following portion of his original petition to the Legislature for bounty lands, dated January 28, 1798, now deposited in the State Library, Albany, NY, shows part of his army service:

THE PETITION OF WALTER VROOMAN WIMPLE OF THE TOWN OF CLEVERACK IN THE COUNTY OF COLUMBIA

HUMBLY SHEWETH

That your petitioner in the year 1775 entered the General Hospital as Senior Surgeon and that he was at the time of his so entering into the service and hath been ever since a Citizen of this State, that he went with the Army into Canada and remained there until the Summer of the ensuing year and that while he remained in Canada he had the care of the General Hospital under the direction of Doctor Stringer, the then Director and Surgeon General of the Northern Department, that he continued to act as Senior Surgeon until some time in the year 1777 and until the aforesaid Director was superceded by the appointment of Doctor Johannes Potts as Director of the Hospital in the Northern Department.

(Apparently, he never got any bounty lands for WBW doesn't cover the subject. DRW).

After the Revolution, he settled in Claverack, where he was married May 29, 1785 to Polly (Mary) Hogeboom, the second daughter of Stephen Hogeboom of that place. Here he practiced his profession during the remainder of his lifetime. He was for several years the treasurer of Columbia County and was a man of great dignity and importance in the community, being also possessed of considerable wealth.

He is buried in the old portion of the Claverack cemetery and his gravestone contains this inscription: Dr. Walter Vrooman Wemple, died Aug 10, 1789 in the 47th year of his age, after his death, his widow married General William Thomas, a Troy lawyer; she resided in Troy until the death of her second husband, when she returned to Claverack and lived with her widowed sister, Mrs. Russell, on the old Hogeboom homestead. She lies buried, by her first husband and the inscription on her gravestone reads as follows: Mary Thomas, second daughter of Steven Hogeboom, Esq., died June 3, 1843, aged 76 yrs., 5 mos., 13 days. She had no children by Gen'l. Thomas.

Dr. Wemple and Mary Hogeboom had but two children, who both died very young. The gravestones of these two children are, at the present time (1896), in the Cellar of the old house formerly owned and occupied by Steven Hogeboom, the father of Dr. Wemple's wife, and which still stands. The inscription read as follows: Stephen Walter V. Wemple, died Oct. 11, 1793, aged 3 yrs. and 16 days; Rachel Hiltjye Wemple, daughter of Walter and Mary Wemple, died Sept 26, 1798, aged 16 days. Where the bodies lie is unknown, but probably they are buried beside their parents in the family, and why the gravestones are deposited in the cellar, where they apparently have been for years, is an unsolved mystery.

(The following letter was written by Milton A. Fowler. He was of no relation to the Wemples. DRW
)
The privilege of publishing the following letter relating to the Doctor, his residence and life, has been granted:

#255 Main Street, Poughkeepsie, March 21, 1891.

Randall N. Saunders,

Dear Sir:

Your letter to my father was received this morning and I have promised him to answer it. I do not care to have you quote me or mention me, but am ready to give you all the facts as far as we know them, so that you can write an article of your own upon the subject.

The old deeds of the property I gave to Mr. Nichols last fall but I think I can remember sufficiently to set you right. I saw last week a statement in reference to the finding of a marked brick which would indicate that the house was more than 100 years old. Such is not the fact as I am thoroughly satisfied from the following. These old deeds which, as I recollect, were dated some time in 1790, I think about 1798. One by the grandfather of John Miller who resided just west of this place, and the other by a brother of his who resided where Mr. Van Rensselaer now resides.

The two parcels of irregular shape made up the lot as it was owned by my father, containing about one acre, and subsequently he bought another quarter of an acre lying just west of the place proper from Mr. John Miller. The deeds were given to Dr. Walter Vrooman Wemple, commonly known as Dr. Vrooman, who built the house and barn now on the premises. The house originally had a short roof sloping toward the street, and another longer one sloping back; the back part of the house being only about one story high. This had been changed before my father bought the property so as to be two stories in height in the back, but still in roofs sloped as before, In 1847 my father took off the whole of the roof and put on a new one in its present shape. The title to the property passed from Dr. Wemple to his widow, whether by deed or will I do not know. She afterwards married a Mr. Thomas and was living, when I was a little boy, with a Mrs. Russell, her sister, who resided where Peter Best afterwards resided. When Mrs. Thomas died, which must have been about 1845, the property passed, either by will or heirship, to her sister Mrs. Russell, and Mrs. Russell deeded it to my father. Thus, you will see that the title has never passed through many hands.

The barn, when we went there in 1847, had in it in the east end four finished rooms. Two on the main floor and two above with stairways, and still above that and reaching over the four rooms and the stairway was a large room finished for pigeons and showed that there must have been an immense stock of pigeons kept there. The west end of the room had been somewhat remodeled before we went there, but my father changed it so as to have his slaughter-house in that end and made a stable and hay-mow of the east end, leaving one of the four rooms as a granary, which, as I understand it, is still there. The old cellar under the barn of which you speak, was to me as a little boy, a great curiosity.

My father took up the whole of the old floors and removed an immense accumulation of barn refuse, cleaning out the old cellar and the arched addition thereto. of which you speak. At that time the old doors separating the arched part from the main cellar, were still in part there. We understood this arched part, which you think must have been a tomb, to have been a wine cellar.

Dr. Wemple was a man of means, had a number of slaves, and as my father and understand it, his slaves slept in these rooms in the barn and, as we always supposed, used this large cellar as a vegetable cellar and the small one as a wine vault. . . .

Mr. Jeremiah Race who gave my father and myself a good deal on information about this Dr. Vrooman, as he was called, said that he was a man of luxurious tastes and who lived in much style, having a very large practice and being very independent.

Yours truly,

Milton A Fowler. . . .
 
WEMPLE, Walter Vrooman (I542)
 
88 Early in life he removed to Canada and for many years was not in communication with relatives and this gave rise to the report (among his cousins) that he had died unmarried and without issue. This statement seemed so well authenticated that it was published as a fact (in the New York and Genealogical Record, Vol. 36, p. 96) and only later discovered to be an error. He remained in Canada until about 1840, when he went to Michigan and lived there up to the time of his death. WBW WEMPLE, Benjamin Franklin (I1873)
 
89 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. RYALL, Alan Stuart (I1649)
 
90 Edward Clark was living in Washington, DC, in 2002. He retirted from the U.S. Foreign Service in 1973. CLARK, Edward Wemple (I6812)
 
91 Ella Kate Wemple Wilson, Myndert's fourth great-granddaughter, submitted this paper to the Schenectady County Historical Society. It is titled MYNDERT WEMPLE 1701-1738 and dated August 1, 1988 and was prepared by Mrs. Ella-Kate Wemple Wilson:

Myndert Wemple was baptized in the Schenectady Reformed Church November 9, 1701, the first born son of Johannes Wemp and Catalina Schermerhorn. (1-1) Both parents belonged to families with large landholdings and they held positions of influence in the community.

Three more children were born in the household and when Myndert was about age 7 his mother died. In 1909 his father married again, to Ariaantje Swits. (2-1)

Myndert's grandfather, Reyer Schermerhorn, died February 1719 and bequeathed farmland to the four children of Catalina, on the Seventh Flat on the north side of the Mohawk River. This land they held until 1733. (3-1)

Myndert left home and went to Boston to work for his cousin, Jacob Wendell. Jacob was born in Albany in 1691 and moved to Boston where he became a well known merchant and ship owner. A nephew, John Wendell, became associated with him in business. (4-1) In time, Jacob Wendell promoted Myndert Wemple to be the captain of his sloop Albany for trading along the eastern seaboard and Caribbean ports. Boston newspapers reported the arrivals dn departures of all trading vessels as shown on (the) enclosed page, and thus we have a list of Voges made.

Ben Franklin's PENNSYLVANIA GAZETTE reported a hurricane in the port of Charleston, SC on August 27, 1730. He lists eleven vessels in port; he lists the the ships which were lost, and he lists others which rode out the storm. In the latter group was the Sloop Albany of Boston, Mindert Wemple, Master. (5-1)

Myndert was probably on his way to his wedding. The entry in the Saint Peters Parish Register of Talbot County, MD shows Captain Mangret Wimple married Sarah Mills October 22, 1730. One wonders if that was the way he pronounced his name? According to the same Parish Register, Sarah Mills was baptized there December, 1707, the daughter of David and Mary Mills. (See enclosure)

The Captain took his bride to Boston to live and he continued his coastwise trading. The Maryland Historical Society has the original record of the Port of Oxford on the eastern shore of Maryland showing that on December 13, 1731 Cap'n Mindert Wimple in the Sloop Albany, paid the fees and duties of 19 pounds, 14 shillings and 8 Pense for his cargo of English goods, rum and Madera wine, and he left the port again on March 23. (See enclosure)

The master of a ship trading in the Chesapeake was obliged not only to navigate his ship, but also to dispose of the cargo, purchase tobacco and engage freight. From activity of this sort it was a short step to settle down and become a merchant in his own right.

On October 21, 1735 Mindert Wymple, mariner, bought from Anthony Richardson, gent. of Talbot County for 60 pounds current money of Maryland 250 acres of land in Dorchester County on the Great Choptank River. (1-2) This was an excellent site for his purpose. The Choptank was navigable from the Chesapeake Bay up to Cabin Creek, and the surrounding farm lands were already cultivated for commercial production of tobacco.

Myndert died in March 1738.

The next record is an Inventory of the goods and chattels of Mindert Wimple, late of Dorchester County, Deceased, 8th day of November Anno 1739 (1-3)

The inventory reflects a man who was well dressed, lived conformably, had settled down to become a merchant in his own right, and a planter of tobacco and farm products like his neighbors. He had 3 cows, a small bull and a heifer, 2 large oxen, 10 head sheep, 2 horses, 6 head hogs and 1 servant man called Thomas who had 1 year and 5 months to serve. The oddest thing was that the inventory contains 20 chairs. He must have lived in a large house.

In Chancery Court a suit was filed: On November 22, 1739 came Jacob Wendell, John Wendell and Edmund Quincy, of the New England Merchants of Boston, who exhibited their suit against John Harris and Sarah his wife. Sarah had remarried immediately! (2-3)

The suit brings out the story. Before 1736 Mindert Wimple made voyages to and from Boston, representing the New England merchants. On each voyage from Boston before 1736 he used to bring a cargo of goods, and the effects which such cargo purchased here to carry with him to Boston and there settle his accounts on the completion of each voyage. After he moved to Maryland he continued to receive goods and effects, as a factor, for sale. He also had good from other persons in Boston and in his books little distinction was made.

The complainants alleged that Mindert owned them an unpaid balance amounting to 5,000 pounds New England currency. The defendants were sure this couldn't be true, but they had trouble understanding the accounts. A commission was appointed by the court to make a study and they resolved that the amount due to Jacob Wendell and company was 199 pounds.

From the Chancery Suit there are lists of goods which were traded, and they are worth perusing.

From Boston, sent to Cap'n Wimple for sale in Maryland were fabrics such as Dowles, fine and course, Cambrics, Wide Garlic, Blew Calico, Cotton Rabalais, and Rushis Linen.

And there are Oznabrigs, one time quoted in yards, one time in pounds, and one in half bushels. (1-4)

There were bricks, axes, pots and kettles, jugs and chamber pots. There was rum, wine, molasses, cheese, salt, pepper, ginger, allspice and sugar.

From Maryland to Boston went wheat, corn, walnut timber, and pork.

Even in that day court action was not speedy. The deliberations of the court started in 1739, and the final decision was not reached until February, 1745.

What about the children of Myndert and Sarah? According to The Wemple Genealogy there were three boys and a girl who died young. (2-4) The boys were named Johannes, Myndert and Andrew. When their grandfather Johannes Wemple wrote his will in 1748 he named the two sons of my deceased son Myndert - John and Myndert. (3-4) What happened to Andrew? I do not know. According to tradition the boys left Maryland and moved to the Schenectady area in 1759. It was Myndert, son of Mindert Wimple of Dorchester County, deceased who sold the 250 Maryland acres in 1767.

(1-1) Schenectady Reformed Church Baptisms, 1694-1811
(2-1) Genealogies of the First Settlers of Schenectady. pg. 289
(3-1) History of the Schenectady Patent. Pearson. pg. 143
(4-1) N.E.H.G.R. July 1882. pg. 246
(5-1) Abstracts from Ben Franklin's PENNSYLVANIA GAZETTE. 1728-1748 pp 31-32
(1-2) Dorchester County Land Records. Libra Old #9, Fol. 324-5 MD State Archives.
(1-3) Inventories Liber 24, Fol. 389-90 MD State Archives.
(2-3) Chancery Record. Vol. 7, pp 513-30 MD State Archives.
(1-4) Osnabury. A kind of course linen originally made in Osnabruck, North Germany.
(2-4) NYG&B July 1904. pg 195.
(3-4) Dorchester County Land Records. Old Vol. 22 pp. 360-363.


SOME OF THE VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN MINDERT WIMPLE
Abstracted from the Boston newspapers, THE BOSTON GAZETTE and THE WEEKLY NEWSLETTER.

1730
Apr. 29 Entered inwards from South Carolina.
May 6 Cleared out for South Carolina.
July 1 Entered inwards from South Carolina.
July 8 Outward bound for New York.
Aug. 27 In hurricane, Port of Charleston, SC.
Oct. 12 Entered inwards from South Carolina.
Nov. 11 Cleared out for Virginia.

1731
Apr.28 Entered for Newfoundland.
May 5 Entered inwards from Newfoundland.
July 21 Cleared out for New York and Albany.
Oct. 6 Entered inwards from New York.
Nov. 27 Cleared out for Virginia.

1732
Apr. 12 Entered inwards from Maryland.
Apr. 12 Outbound for Newfoundland.
June 21 Entered inwards from South Carolina.
Aug. 9 Cleared out for Newfoundland.

1733
June 6 Entered inwards from the Isle of May.
June 27 Outward bound for Barbados.

1734
July 17 Cleared out for London.
Dec. 5 Entered from New Castle.

1735
Jan. 15 Cleared out for Leeward Islands.
Jul. 5 Entered inwards for Antigua.
Jul.16 Cleared out for Maryland.

1736 Outward for West Indies. 
WEMPLE, Ella Kate (I4843)
 
92 Ella Kate Wemple Wilson, Myndert's fourth great-granddaughter, submitted this paper to the Schenectady County Historical Society. It is titled Myndert Wemple 1701-1738 and dated August 1, 1988, prepared by Mrs. Ella-Kate Wemple Wilson:

Myndert Wemple was baptized in the Schenectady Reformed Church November 9, 1701, the first born son of Johannes Wemp and Catalina Schermerhorn. (1-1) Both parents belonged to families with large landholdings and they held positions of influence in the community.

Three more children were born in the household and when Myndert was about age 7 his mother died. In 1909 his father married again, to Ariaantje Swits. (2-1)

Myndert's grandfather, Reyer Schermerhorn, died February 1719 and bequeathed farmland to the four children of Catalina, on the Seventh Flat on the north side of the Mohawk River. This land they held until 1733. (3-1)

Myndert left home and went to Boston to work for his cousin, Jacob Wendell. Jacob was born in Albany in 1691 and moved to Boston where he became a well known merchant and ship owner. A nephew, John Wendell, became associated with him in business. (4-1) In time, Jacob Wendell promoted Myndert Wemple to be the captain of his sloop Albany for trading along the eastern seaboard and Caribbean ports. Boston newspapers reported the arrivals and departures of all trading vessels as shown on (the) enclosed page, and thus we have a list of Voges made.

Ben Franklin's PENNSYLVANIA GAZETTE reported a hurricane in the port of Charleston, SC on August 27, 1730. He lists eleven vessels in port; he lists the the ships which were lost, and he lists others which rode out the storm. In the latter group was the Sloop Albany of Boston, Mindert Wemple, Master. (5-1)

Myndert was probably on his way to his wedding. The entry in the Saint Peters Parish Register of Talbot County, MD shows Captain Mangret Wimple married Sarah Mills October 22, 1730. One wonders if that was the way he pronounced his name? According to the same Parish Register, Sarah Mills was baptized there December, 1707, the daughter of David and Mary Mills. (See enclosure)

The Captain took his bride to Boston to live and he continued his coastwise trading. The Maryland Historical Society has the original record of the Port of Oxford on the eastern shore of Maryland showing that on December 13, 1731 Cap'n Mindert Wimple in the Sloop Albany, paid the fees and duties of 19 pounds, 14 shillings and 8 Pense for his cargo of English goods, rum and Madera wine, and he left the port again on March 23. (See enclosure)

The master of a ship trading in the Chesapeake was obliged not only to navigate his ship, but also to dispose of the cargo, purchase tobacco and engage freight. From activity of this sort it was a short step to settle down and become a merchant in his own right.

On October 21, 1735 Mindert Wymple, mariner, bought from Anthony Richardson, gent. of Talbot County for 60 pounds current money of Maryland 250 acres of land in Dorchester County on the Great Choptank River. (1-2) This was an excellent site for his purpose. The Choptank was navigable from the Chesapeake Bay up to Cabin Creek, and the surrounding farm lands were already cultivated for commercial production of tobacco.

Myndert died in March 1738.

The next record is an Inventory of the goods and chattels of Mindert Wimple, late of Dorchester County, Deceased, 8th day of November Anno 1739 (1-3)

The inventory reflects a man who was well dressed, lived conformably, had settled down to become a merchant in his own right, and a planter of tobacco and farm products like his neighbors. He had 3 cows, a small bull and a heifer, 2 large oxen, 10 head sheep, 2 horses, 6 head hogs and 1 servant man called Thomas who had 1 year and 5 months to serve. The oddest thing was that the inventory contains 20 chairs. He must have lived in a large house.

In Chancery Court a suit was filed: On November 22, 1739 came Jacob Wendell, John Wendell and Edmund Quincy, of the New England Merchants of Boston, who exhibited their suit against John Harris and Sarah his wife. Sarah had remarried immediately! (2-3)

The suit brings out the story. Before 1736 Mindert Wimple made voyages to and from Boston, representing the New England merchants. On each voyage from Boston before 1736 he used to bring a cargo of goods, and the effects which such cargo purchased here to carry with him to Boston and there settle his accounts on the completion of each voyage. After he moved to Maryland he continued to receive goods and effects, as a factor, for sale. He also had good from other persons in Boston and in his books little distinction was made.

The complainants alleged that Mindert owned them an unpaid balance amounting to 5,000 pounds New England currency. The defendants were sure this couldn't be true, but they had trouble understanding the accounts. A commission was appointed by the court to make a study and they resolved that the amount due to Jacob Wendell and company was 199 pounds.

From the Chancery Suit there are lists of goods which were traded, and they are worth perusing.

From Boston, sent to Cap'n Wimple for sale in Maryland were fabrics such as Dowles, fine and course, Cambrics, Wide Garlic, Blew Calico, Cotton Rabalais, and Rushis Linen.

And there are Oznabrigs, one time quoted in yards, one time in pounds, and one in half bushels. (1-4)

There were bricks, axes, pots and kettles, jugs and chamber pots. There was rum, wine, molasses, cheese, salt, pepper, ginger, allspice and sugar.

From Maryland to Boston went wheat, corn, walnut timber, and pork.

Even in that day court action was not speedy. The deliberations of the court started in 1739, and the final decision was not reached until February, 1745.

What about the children of Myndert and Sarah? According to The Wemple Genealogy there were three boys and a girl who died young. (2-4) The boys were named Johannes, Myndert and Andrew. When their grandfather Johannes Wemple wrote his will in 1748 he named the two sons of my deceased son Myndert - John and Myndert. (3-4) What happened to Andrew? I do not know. According to tradition the boys left Maryland and moved to the Schenectady area in 1759. It was Myndert, son of Mindert Wimple of Dorchester County, deceased who sold the 250 Maryland acres in 1767.

(1-1) Schenectady Reformed Church Baptisms, 1694-1811
(2-1) Genealogies of the First Settlers of Schenectady. pg. 289
(3-1) History of the Schenectady Patent. Pearson. pg. 143
(4-1) N.E.H.G.R. July 1882. pg. 246
(5-1) Abstracts from Ben Franklin's PENNSYLVANIA GAZETTE. 1728-1748 pp 31-32
(1-2) Dorchester County Land Records. Libra Old #9, Fol. 324-5 MD State Archives.
(1-3) Inventories Liber 24, Fol. 389-90 MD State Archives.
(2-3) Chancery Record. Vol. 7, pp 513-30 MD State Archives.
(1-4) Osnabury. A kind of course linen originally made in Osnabruck, North Germany.
(2-4) NYG&B July 1904. pg 195.
(3-4) Dorchester County Land Records. Old Vol. 22 pp. 360-363.


SOME OF THE VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN MINDERT WIMPLE
Abstracted from the Boston newspapers, THE BOSTON GAZETTE and THE WEEKLY NEWSLETTER.

1730
Apr. 29 Entered inwards from South Carolina.
May 6 Cleared out for South Carolina.
July 1 Entered inwards from South Carolina.
July 8 Outward bound for New York.
Aug. 27 In hurricane, Port of Charleston, SC.
Oct. 12 Entered inwards from South Carolina.
Nov. 11 Cleared out for Virginia.

1731
Apr.28 Entered for Newfoundland.
May 5 Entered inwards from Newfoundland.
July 21 Cleared out for New York and Albany.
Oct. 6 Entered inwards from New York.
Nov. 27 Cleared out for Virginia.

1732
Apr. 12 Entered inwards from Maryland.
Apr. 12 Outbound for Newfoundland.
June 21 Entered inwards from South Carolina.
Aug. 9 Cleared out for Newfoundland.

1733
June 6 Entered inwards from the Isle of May.
June 27 Outward bound for Barbados.

1734
July 17 Cleared out for London.
Dec. 5 Entered from New Castle.

1735
Jan. 15 Cleared out for Leeward Islands.
Jul. 5 Entered inwards for Antigua.
Jul.16 Cleared out for Maryland.

1736 Outward for West Indies.


The following is from a manuscript sent to the compiler on September 28, 2000 by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI. This manuscript was written by William Barent Wemple, compiler of the first part if this genealogy from 1885-1913. The manuscript was never published.

He was baptized November 9, 1701, in the Reformed Chruch, Schenectady; married Sarah Mills. He was not living in 1748, when his father's will was made.

In DEEDS F --- No. 6, page 145, Albany County Clerk's office, Albany, NY is a deed, dated August 8, 1727, in which Mindert Wimpel, of Boston, in the Province of Massachusetts Bay, mariner, deed to his brother Reyer Wemp, land at Hoffman's Ferry, which his grandfather, Reyer Schermerhorn, had devised to Myndert, Reyer and Arientie, it being his share of one just sixth part of the eastermost half of the seaventh fflatts, lying and being on the north side of the Marques River, about seven miles above the said Town of Schonectady and also a sixth part of a tract in New Jersey about twenty-seven miles about Amboy.

His marriage was somewhat romantic. He was the captain of a vessel and on one of the voyages from Scotland, he had as a passenger a young Scotch woman by the name of Sarah Mills. They fell in love and the passage across the Atlantic in those days consuming several months, they had ample opportunity for courtship and ascertaining their true feelings, so that when they landed they were prepared to become man and wife, which they at once did.

He finally settled with his family in Baltimore, MD, where he died, as evidenced by a letter still in possession of Miss Sarah Wemple, of Charlton, NY, which was written in 1760 by his widow, who had at that time married a Harris, for her second husband, and is directed as follows: Mr John Wempell, son of Captain Myndert Wempell deceased in Maryland, living in Schenectady.

Myndert's children all moved North and settled close to the old home, in or near the Mohawk Valley.

On November 3, 1767 his son Myndert sells to Philip Walker, 250 acres of land in Dorchester County, Maryland, on Great Choplank River; the deed recites that Mindart Wimple (son of Mindart Wimple, late of Dorchester County, deceased) is the grantor. A copy of this deed is in possession of the above mentioned Miss Sarah Wemple.

From his roving disposition, the common error has crept in that he was born in Holland, England, or some other foreign country and emigrated to America. Many are the stories on this basis that have been related by some of his descendants, but they are all illusions and the above facts can be implicitly relied upon, for great care has been taken on that account. 
WEMPLE, Myndert (I435)
 
93 Elmer Veeder Wemple was a NYC Engineer and he played golf up until 3 years before his death. He had many trophies in his livingroom for Senior Citizens Golf Tournements he had won.

He took a terrible fall on 4/10/2002 and hit his head so badly that he went into a coma, and died two days later. 
WEMPLE, Elmer Veeder (I4158)
 
94 Emmet L. Wemple I was for many years recognized as one of the leading surgeons of San Francisco, and was one of the founders of the Clara Barton Hospital of that city. During the earthquake of 1906, it is said that that through overwork caring for his patients, he over taxed himself and suffered ill heath, eventually resulting in his collapse and death. About 1876 he moved from the mining town of Nortonville, CA and moved to Antioch, CA and built a residence there. GJW

The following is from an unpublished manuscript, written by William Barent Wemple II, compiler of the first part if this genealogy from 1885-1913, sent to the compiler on September 28, 2000 by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI.

. . .; he lived with his parents until 1862, when he left his home and went to work for a sheep-raiser; continued there for three months and then did farm work till the fall of 1863, at which time he entered the Marysville high school, remaining there one year; he then passed the examinations in Yuba City for teacher's certificate receiving a second grade and immediately began teaching school; he taught for eight months and then went to (the) University of Pacific in San Jose, for a year; he again taught school for a term and then entered the California State Norman School. graduated in 1868 and resumed teaching; abandoned the profession in 1870 to enter the Cooper Medical College from which he graduated in 1873; during his term as medical student he served in the capacity of resident physician of the U. S. Marine Hospital in San Francisco; after graduating he went to Nortonville, Contra Costa County, and engaged in the practice of medicine; on April 15, 1874, he was married to Annie Isabelle Gunn; he removed from Nortonville to Antioch in 1876 and while here he served from 1879 to 1881 a school superintendent for the county of Contra Costa; on May 17, 1889 they left Antioch for San Francisco where they now reside; the doctor has a State wide reputation and a lucrative practice. His wife was born in Woonsocket, RI, April 15, 1852. 
WEMPLE, Emmet Leroy (I1825)
 
95 Evelyn Wemple

A private graveside service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday at Grangeville Baptist Church Cemetery in Grangeville for Evelyn Wade Wemple, 76, a resident of Hattiesburg, Miss., who died April 12, 1999.

Burial will be at the church cemetery.

She was the wife of Robert Mack Wemple of Hattiesburg; and mother of Robin W. Berteau of Hattiesburg and Anne W. Cutcher of Shreveport. She is also survived by five grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

She was a homemaker and member of Main Street Baptist Church of Hattiesburg.

Donations to the Main Street Baptist Church Building Fund are preferred.

Hulett-Winstead Funeral Home of Hattiesburg, Miss. is in charge of arrangements.

 
WADE, Audria Evelyn (I4755)
 
96 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. WEMPLE, William John (I6850)
 
97 Farm raised in California, he joined the Army Air Corps in 1940. He served for the next 36-37 years with the flying arm of the U.S. military and he retired with the rank of full colonel. Early on during WW II, Helen met with Neil at Neil's assigned base in Latin America and they flew to Tapachula, Mexico in a O-47A to get married. During his tenure with the air force, he mostly flew bombers and was one of the original pilots for the B-29's that were stationed in India. He flew over the hump on many occasions, flying fuel and bombs from India to China for their own raids over Japan. He was promoted to major early on during the war and was known as the boy major by his men, because of his young appearance. Before his retirement, he was Commander 3974th Combat Support Group Zaragoza Air Base, Spain. They presently reside in Tucson, AZ. DRW

Service decorations:

1. Distinguished Flying Cross, with one Oak Leaf Cluster
2. Bronze Star Medal
3. Air Metal, with three Oak Leaf Clusters
4. Commendation Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters
5. Meritious Service Medal

Medals, Citations, and Campaignes

1. Distinguished Unit Citation with two Oak Leaf Clusters
2. American Defense Campaign Metal with Bronze Star
3. American Campaign Medal with Bronze Star
4. Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with four Bronze Stars
5. World War II Victory Metal
6. National Defense Service Medal
7. Phuilippine Liberation Ribbon
9. Phillippine Independence Ribbon
10. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award
11. China War Memorial Medal

Total Flying Time 5710:45 hours

Instructor Pilot 586 hours
First Pilot 3852 hours
Night 567 hours
Instrument 500 hours
Command Pilot 147 hours
Co Pilot 878 hours

Instrument and Night also included in other catagories.

Aircraft in which most flying performed:
B29 1500 hours
B-17 750 hours
B-47 600 hours
T-33 400 hours
B-24 250 hours

Command Positions

1. Aircraft Commander
2. Commander, 44th Bomb Sq.
3. Commander, 327th Bobm Sq.
4. Deputy Commander, 6th Bomb Wing
5. Deputy Commander, 509th Wing
6. Commander, 3974th Combat Support Group
7. Commander, 3973rd Combat Support Group
8. Deputy Commander, 3800th Air Base Wing
9. Commander, 6592nd Support Group

Promotions

1. Flying Cadet 25 November 1940
2. Second Lieutenant 12 July 1941
3. First Lieutenant 1 February 1942
3. Captain 27 July 1942
4. Major 15 October 1943
5. Lt. Colonel 18 June 1945
5. Colonel 19 January 1951

Retired 01 August 1969

A great deal of information on Neil can be found on the following website, http://www.40thbombgroup.org. When you get to the site, search on each page for the word wemple.

From Tuscon.com

Neil Waldon Wemple, Colonel, USAF Retired, died October 31, 2002 in Tucson, AZ. He was born February 26, 1918 in Milford, Lassen County, CA, the 11th child of Jay C. Wemple, a cattle rancher and Libby A. Wemple (both deceased). He attended elementary school in Milford and graduated from Lassen High School and Junior College in Susanville, CA. He completed his education at San Jose State University with a degree in Commerce. His love of airplanes and flying encouraged him to apply for pilot training in the Army Air Corps. On July 11, 1941 he graduated from flying school at Brooks Field, Texas. Neil was commissioned a 2nd Lt, leading to a 30 year career in Military Service. During his career he accumulated 7000 hours of flying. Col. Wemple flew a total of 36 different military aircraft, the last being the B-52. His war years included stations in Puerto Rico and Guatemala, flying submarine patrol in B-17-E's and B-240's. He served in the CBI (China, Burma, India) Theater and on Tinian Island, completing a total of 42 months overseas duty. His war record included 28 combat missions against Japan and in the Asiatic Theater. He returned to CA at war's end, having circled the globe and having visited 60 countries. His autobiography is chronicled in two volumes, written by him for his children, family and friends. Col. Wemple is survived by his loving wife of 59 years, Helen; daughter, Forrest W. Levely; sons, Stephen S. (Linda) Wemple, Neil T. Wemple and grandchildren, Karah L. (Frank) Rinaldi, Thomas Scott Levely and Krystal Carter; great-granddaughters, Alexis and Kaia Rinaldi. Memorial services with Military Honors will be held Monday, November 11, 2002 at 5:00 p.m. in the East Lawn Palm Mortuary Chapel, 5801 E. Grant Rd. 
WEMPLE, Neil Waldon (I13)
 
98 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. SALLS, Damien Tyrone (I12232)
 
99 Francis Holland (Wemple) and his brother Edward (both sons of Jacob) married half sisters: Mary Ann Carter and Martha Adeline Carter. DRW

Information from a letter sent to the compiler by Mrs. Ann W. Gilman, dated May 21, 1996:

WEMPLE FAMILY

About 1840, Jacob Anthony Wemple, with his wife Delia Vischer and young son, Francis Holland, made their way to Morgan County, Illinois, from their farm home on the Mohawk River in New York State. They settled on a farm near Waverly. As the family grew, Edward was born in 1847 and Winfield Scott, who succumbed to scarlet fever, a few years later. Many enterprises were undertaken. Wheat was hauled to Alton for sale and grinding. As this required much preparation, the venture was soon abandoned. Delia, much to the annoyance of all, made cheese. Jacob managed to hold on to some of the cash he handled and was able to make small loans and still keep his money together.

During the Civil War, Holland was taken into the Army and held in Training Camp at Cairo (IL). Edward, who was just a boy, stayed at home and helped keep the home fires burning. Sometime after the war, Holland held a clerical position with Crain Manson and Company, a business firm.

Edward remained with the farm, trying out all the recent farm machinery as it appeared on the market. He attended college at Bloomington, Illinois. The money lending developed more formally and Wemple Brothers', a partnership was organized in 1877. All was not serene, there were law-suits and a fire, but impeccable honesty and integrity remained. Wemple State Bank was incorporated in 1918.

Holland Wemple married Mary Ann Carter. They had four sons, Charles Francis, called Frank; Orrin Anthony, who died while attending Illinois College; William Lester and Paul Wilbur.

Edward Wemple married Martha Adeline Carter. They had six children, Harriet Leona, Mary Edith, Jay Earl, Leland Edward, Clarence Carter and Holland Russell.

In spite of the ravages of time and change some of the family remain. Clarence Wemple resides in Waverly (deceased 1978). P. W. Wemple is with the Wemple State Bank, where is Vice President (deceased 1980). The new generation is established in the New York area and come to Waverly for short visits.


The following is from an unpublished manuscript, written by William Barent Wemple, compiler of the first part if this genealogy from 1885-1913, sent to the compiler on September 28, 2000 by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI.

He was born February 19, 1803; married Delia Vischer September 4, 1839; died October 31, 1889. His wife was born September 26, 1814 and died July 24, 1887. He left his old home four miles from Amsterdam, on the Mohawk River in Montgomery County, in 1839 and emigrated to Illinois, settling in Sangamon County, 25 miles south of Springfield. His business during all his 50 years residence in Sangamon County was that of farming, at which he was very successful. 
WEMPLE, Jacob Anthony (I778)
 
100 From TheTownTalk.com

RUTH STAFFORD WEMPLE

Posted on August 21, 2002

Funeral services for Ruth Stafford Wemple will be at 11 a.m. today in the chapel of Melancon Funeral Home, Bunkie with Dr. George Hearn officiating. Valerie Harper will be the soloist. Burial will be in the Cheneyville Christian Cemetery.

Visitation at the Melancon Funeral Home will begin at 9:30 a.m. and will continue at the family home following the services.

Ruth Wemple was born February 16, 1912 and died Tuesday, August 20, 2002 in her home after a lengthy illness. She was 90. She was the last of twelve siblings from the marriage of Leroy and Priscilla Allen Stafford. She was a life long resident of Cheneyville and a member of Beulah Baptist Church.

Ruth is survived by her husband Philip Wemple of Cheneyville; two daughters, Hope Wemple of Cheneyville and Priscilla Branch of Alexandria; two grandsons, David Branch and his wife Mary of Cheneyville and Justin Branch of Alexandria; and one great-granddaughter. She is also survived by her nephew, John Leroy Klock and his wife Jana of Bunkie and their sons John Klock, Jr. and Phil Klock plus many more nephews, nieces, great-nieces, and great-nephews.

Pallbearers will be Lowell King, Robert LaCour, Blake Young, Ron Wilkins, John Klock, Jr., Philip Klock, Ken Wilkins, Leroy Stafford, and Alvin May, III.

Memorials may be made to: Beulah Baptist Church, Cheneyville, La., 71325, Christus St. Frances Cabrini Hospice, 3410 Masonic Dr., Alexandria, La. 71301 or the National Parkinsons Foundation, Inc., 1501 NW 9th Ave., Bob Hope Road, Miami, Florida, 33136-1494.

 
STAFFORD, Ruth Gayle (I4752)
 

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