Johann Myndert WEMPLE

Male 1764 - 1837  (72 years)


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  • Name Johann Myndert WEMPLE 
    Born 28 Nov 1764  Caughnawaga, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 28 Jun 1837  Wampsville, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1695  Wemple Family Ancestry
    Last Modified 13 Dec 2017 

    Father Hendrick WEMPLE,   b. 1730,   d. Aft 1790  (Age > 61 years) 
    Mother Aefje VAN EPPS,   b. (BEF. 5 Jan 1734/35),   d. Bef 1830 
    Married 11 Jan 1755 
    Family ID F478  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Nancy WINN,   b. Abt 1765,   d. 24 Jan 1796  (Age ~ 31 years) 
    Married 01 Jan 1791 
    Children 
     1. Infant WEMPLE,   b. Abt 1792, died at age four months. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1792  (Age ~ 0 years)
     2. Eveline J. WEMPLE,   b. 24 Jan 1796,   d. 04 Apr 1874, Owasso, MI Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
    Last Modified 13 Dec 2017 
    Family ID F524  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Sara VAN ALSTINE,   b. 16 Jun 1773,   d. 25 Nov 1852, Wampsville, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Married 16 Jul 1797 
    Children 
     1. Annyte WEMPLE,   b. 15 Jan 1799,   d. 22 Jan 1874  (Age 75 years)
     2. Hendrick WEMPLE,   b. 11 Dec 1800,   d. 20 Feb 1814  (Age 13 years)
     3. Maria WEMPLE,   b. 01 May 1803, Wampsville, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Aug 1870, Oneida, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
     4. Benjamin Franklin WEMPLE,   b. 15 Dec 1804,   d. 22 Jan 1885, Sebewa, Ionia County, MI Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     5. Sally WEMPLE,   b. 03 Dec 1808,   d. 01 Feb 1809  (Age 0 years)
     6. Sarah Jane WEMPLE,   b. 10 Dec 1810, Wampsville, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 06 Apr 1883, Richfield Springs, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     7. Andrew WEMPLE,   b. 11 Nov 1813, Wampsville, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1903, MI Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age < 89 years)
     8. Eliza WEMPLE,   b. 16 Jul 1818, Wampsville, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Dec 1858, St. Anthony's Hall, MN Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 40 years)
     9. Ally WEMPLE,   b. 29 Jan 1820,   d. Bef 1830  (Age < 9 years)
     10. Helen Amelia WEMPLE,   b. 04 Jul 1829, Wampsville, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 06 Jan 1894, New York City Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
    Last Modified 13 Dec 2017 
    Family ID F525  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • From the TUTTLE RECORDS by William H. Tuttle which were sent to me about 1988 by Olive Boylan, Historian of Munnsville, NY and vicinity:

      Wemple, Johann Myndert (always signed Myndert on deeds - Johann Myndert on some legal documents). First white settler of Wampsville. Village was named Wampsville for him. Was a blacksmith and horse shoer with George Washington's Army. He is said to have forged the huge iron chain that was stretched across the Hudson River at West Point to try and prevent the British fleet in New York from sailing to Albany. Johann Myndert was born December 28, 1765 [note discrepancy on Family Page DRW]. He was about 26 years old when he came to the present site of Wampsville an August 20, 1791. He erected a log shanty on the knoll near the present court house. During the next few years he cleared more land, built a better home, a blacksmith shop and 2 hotels. Wemple's Taverns became popular stopping places.

      JOHANN M. WEMPLE
      The Father of Wampsville
      by George W. Walter

      There was a time when George Washington, first president of the United States, must have thought that present Wampsville might become the capitol of the United States. This is the tradition handed down to descendants of Johann Myndert Wemple, reputed first white settler of Madison County's county seat, according to Willis Tuttle, Hoboken, a great grandson. The family legend reveal that Wemple, also known as Von or Van Wemple, was advised by Washington at the end of the Revolutionary War to go and settle in the central part of New York State - then almost a primeval wilderness.

      Wemple was a Dutchman, who served as a blacksmith and horse shoer with Washington's army. He is said to have forged the huge iron chain that was stretched across the Hudson River at West Point to try and prevent the British fleet from sailing to Albany.

      It must be stated there is a great deal of truth in these Wemple family legends. The Wemple family gained renown in the Mohawk Valley both prior to and during the Revolution for their patriotism. Sir William Johnson, head of Indian affairs, sent Myndert Wemp (same family), also also a blacksmith, into the Seneca Country to reside and follow his trade and also to keep a wary eye on Cornplanter and other chiefs. Wemp stayed in the Indian country until he was driven out during a minor famine. He reported his findings to the Irish baronet at Fort Johnson on April 20, 1756. In his report, Wemp told how John Abeel or Cornplanter was selling great qualities of rum to the Indians. Sir William Johnson promptly shut off trade goods for a time.

      Wemple's Tavern near Johnstown was also a favorite gathering place for both Patriots and Tories, only pretty Peggy Wemple [Margaret Fonda, wife of Barent Wemple who died in 1771 DRW] reported the activities of the Tories to Washington.

      Willis Tuttle related recently he can still remember how his ancestor's most noted hotel looked when he was a boy. Located on the turnpike, just west of the present Court Street, there were rear doors large enough to drive an ox team into the hotel hauling logs for the huge fireplaces. The hotel also had the distinction of having each guest room numbered. The barns and wagon shed that housed the Conestoga wagons, the carriages and wagons of the passing immigrants, as well as their stock stood until recent years in the rear of the hotel. The building, now greatly remodeled, still stands, and is owned by Carlton Sweet.

      When Wemple first came to the site of the present village, he carried with him some $12,000 in English gold and Spanish silver. With this money he purchased from the Oneida Indians on contract over 3,000 acres of land. About 20 years later he was forced to repurchase it from the State, but was allowed considerable rebate on his title.

      WAMPSVILLE, NEW YORK
      An Historical Sketch
      by
      George B. Russell, Esq. 1909

      THE EARLY SETTLERS
      Myndert Wemple was undoubtedly the first while settler at Wampsville. He came there some time about 1784. He was then 20 years of age, had been in General Washington's army, was a blacksmith by trade and shod Washington's horses.

      Wemple located near the corner just across from Mayor McConnell's home, and erected a blacksmith shop, the location of which there is no question about, as Melvin Getman has plowed the land and has found old forgings, large quantities of cinders and some ox-shoes, presumably made by the hand of Myndert Wemple. He also built a mill there and a house where Miss Van De Walker now lives, carved the door-casings, and the rooms were all numbered. He also built the hotel that John Haley used to run and another hotel near the Hebron Spencer place, in front of which is the sulphur spring which flows like an artesian well. This hotel has since been moved and is now occupied by Ed Sults. I am informed that in front of the last hotel there was a large willow tree, which was crotched, and many years ago before there head been placed in the crotch of the tree an ox's head, through which the water of the sulphur spring flowed, the tree having grown completely around the head and all that could be seen of it was the horns and the mouth.


      The following is from a manuscript sent to the compiler on September 28, 2000 by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI. This manuscript was written by William Barent Wemple, compiler of the first part if this genealogy from 1885-1913. The manuscript was never published.

      He was born November 28, 1764, near Caughnawaga and was baptized in the church at that place January 27, 1765. He was married, first, to Nancy Winn, on January 1, 1791. Nancy died January 24, 1796, in giving birth to her daughter, Eveline. He married for his second wife, Sarah Van Alstine, July 16, 1797, their marriage being recorded in the Reformed Church at Stone Arabia. Sarah was a daughter of Martin J. and Nancy Van Alstine. She was born June 16, 1773 and died November 25, 1852, Myndert died June 28, 1837. He and his second wife died and are buried at Wampsville, Madison County, NY. where they rest side by side; the gravestones still remain standing a the heads of their graves and the inscription on them reads as follows: Myndert Wimple died June 28, 1837, aged 71 years, 7months, Sarah, wife of Myndert Wimple, died November 25, 1852, aged 79 yrs., 5 mos., 9 days.

      Martin J. Van Alstine, Sarah's father, was called Big Tree by the Indians. Sarah's mother who was born in 1733 and died at Myndert Wemple's in Wampsville, in 1831, is spoken of to quite an extent by J. Clement in his NOBLE DEEDS OF NOBLE WOMEN. She was one on a family of fifteen children.

      Myndert Wemple moved out into Madison County in the early part of 1800, where he kept a hotel, or tavern as it was called in those days, and around him clustered a few hardy pioneers but, as he was at all times the leading spirit of that then wild section, the settlement became know as Wamps, which was the very usual and customary way of pronouncing, or rather, mispronouncing, he name, as this short and flat corruption was the generally accepted given to a Wemple.

      After more people came within the confines of the locality and it assumed the proportions of a village, the old name still clung and the designation of Wampsville was given to it. Upon the establishment of a post-office at the place, no change was made in the name, so, for nearly a century now, has been handed down the ugly corruption of the surname of him in whose honor it was bestowed.

      On April 6, 1803, the Legislature, during its twenty-seventh session, by Chapter 106, enacted as follows: And, be further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the commissioners, of the land-office, to issue letters patent to Myndert Wemple, hie heirs and assigns, for one hundred acres of land, to be laid out in a square, and to extend each way from the house now occupied by the said Myndert Wemple, along the Genesee road, fifteen chains, and from thence northerly fourteen chains, and southerly twenty chains, he the said Myndert Wemple paying therefor, into the treasury of this state, the sum of one hundred dollars. The payment was made and he land was deeded to him.

      Among the positions of trust and honor conferred upon him, was that of paymaster of the Indians.

      His granddaughter, Mrs. Fanny L. Harding, of Cleveland, OH, has in possession his commission as Ensign of a regiment of militia in the county of Chenango, Colonel John Lencklaen, commanding; it was issued May 5, 1800 and is signed by Jasper Hopper, secretary, and John Jay, Governor of the state of New York.


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