Nancy Amilia ROSS[1]

Female 1832 - 1918  (85 years)


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  • Name Nancy Amilia ROSS 
    Born 29 Oct 1832  Sullivan County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 20 Jun 1918  Kansas City, KS Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried 26 Jun 1918  Topeka Cemetery, Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I3534  Wemple Family Ancestry
    Last Modified 13 Dec 2017 

    Father Sylvester Flint ROSS 
    Mother Sinthy RICE 
    Family ID F4319  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Simon Peter WEMPLE,   b. 04 Jul 1828, Schuyler, Herkimer County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 May 1886, Greaterville, AZ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years) 
    Married 30 Jun 1855  Janesville, WI Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Mary Tophena WEMPLE,   b. 03 Apr 1856, Lawrence, KS Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 06 Dec 1856, Topeka, KS Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     2. Florence WEMPLE,   b. 17 Jan 1858, Topeka, KS Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jan 1862, Lawrence, KS Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 4 years)
     3. Lela WEMPLE,   b. 07 Feb 1861, Lawrence, KS Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Dec 1862, Lawrence, KS Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     4. Mabel WEMPLE,   b. 16 Jan 1863, Lawrence, KS Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Jan 1945, Park View Hospital, Manhatten, KS Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
     5. Ross WEMPLE,   b. 24 May 1866, Dover, Shawnee Co., Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Feb 1906, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 39 years)
     6. Flint Lee WEMPLE,   b. 06 Apr 1870, Springfield, MO Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jul 1945, Long Island, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
    Last Modified 13 Dec 2017 
    Family ID F994  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • The following was sent to the compiler on January 6, 2003 by Mary Lynn McManus Toluchanian, Sierra Madre, CA:

      NANCY AMELIA ROSS (was) born 29 October 1832, Orange, Richland Co., Ohio (per pages purported to be from the Ross Family Bible) or Sullivan, Lorain Co., Ohio (per death certificate, interment record, and obituary). (She) died 20 June 1918, Kansas City, Wyandotte Co., Kansas (and was) buried 26 June 1918, Topeka Cemetery, Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. (She is the) daughter of Sylvester Flint Ross and Sinthy (or Cynthia) Rice.

      Nancy's obituary appeared in the Kansas City Sun (Kansas City, Kansas), issue of 12 July 1918, page 1.

      MRS. AMELIA WEMPLE DIES.

      At 35 minutes past 5 o'clock, Thursday morning, June 20, 1918, Nancy Amelia Wemple passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F. D. Hutchings, 624 Freeman avenue, Kansas City, Kansas, aged 85 years, 7 months and 21 days.

      Mrs. Wemple was one of the pioneer women of Kansas. She was born in Sullivan, Ashland County, Ohio, October 29, 1832, and removed with her parents, when quite a young child, to Shopiere, Wisconsin, where she resided until she was married to S. P. Wemple, June 30, 1855.

      Her father, Sylvester Flint Ross, was a man of great force of character, and a very pronounced anti-slavery advocate. In 1855 the contest in Kansas Territory over the question of whether it should be admitted as a free or slave state was becoming very bitter, and the eyes of all the anti-slavery people of the north were turned toward Bleeding Kansas.

      S. P. Wemple was in thorough sympathy with the anti-slavery proclivities of his bride, Nancy Ross, and her people, and after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Wemple, Mrs. Wemple's father, Sylvester F. Ross, and her mother, her brother, William Ross, and his wife, also a bride, started overland in prairie schooners for Kansas, and arrived in Lawrence sometime in July of the same year. Another brother of Mrs. Wemple's, Edmund G. Ross, afterwards United States Senator from Kansas, soon followed, and the Rosses and Wemples at once became prominent in the contest then being waged between the two factions in the territory. They were visited a number of times by hands of pro-slavery advocates and threatened with violence because they would not surrender a free negro known as Jonah, who had come with them to Kansas, so that he could be sold back into slavery. One of the incidents connected with the persecution of Jonah is depicted in Mrs. Humphrey's book, Squatter Sovereignty. It finally became necessary to send Jonah back north to prevent his being kidnapped.

      Mrs. Wemple helped make bullets in the Wakarusa War, attended the banquet to Governor Shannon, at its close, and took part in all the activities that finally resulted in Kansas being admitted into the Union as a free state. She was living in Lawrence at the time of Quantrell's raid, but fortunately was on a visit to her father at Glen Ross, in Pottawatomie County. Her home and its contents were destroyed.

      In 1868 Mr. and Mrs. Wemple and her brother, William Ross, went to Florida, where they started an orange and sugar plantation on St. John River. They were expecting to gather the first crop when a frost, an almost unheard of thing in that latitude, destroyed the work of years in a single night, and they abandoned their property and came north again, and Mr. Wemple became interested in mining properties in Arizona. When the children were of proper age they came back to Kansas so they could have the advantages of schools, and made their home in Lawrence, and the two older children entered the State University. Mr. Wemple while on one of his trips to Arizona to look after his mining interests, was attacked by a band of Geronimo's Indians and killed near the little town of Graterville, May 25, 1886. Mrs. Wemple was thus left with the responsibility of providing for and looking after the completion of the education of her children, which, with their assistance, she did.

      One of her sons, Ross Wemple, after leaving the University went to Old Mexico, where he became an expert in the locating and selection of lands proper for the cultivation of coffee, sugar and rubber, and for many years was connected with the Real Estate Company of Mexico, with headquarters in the City of Mexico, and Editor of the Mexican Journal of Commerce, a publication devoted to the promotion of the coffee, sugar and rubber industry in Mexico, and especially on the Isthmus of Tehauntepee. Mr. Ross Wemple died in the City of Mexico, February 20, 1906.

      Mrs. Wemple during the last years of her life, has made her home part of the time with her sons and part of time with her daughter, Mrs. F. D. Hutchings, of this city. She was taken seriously ill Monday, June 17, 1918, with pneumonia, and gradually grew weaker until her death, Thursday morning following.

      Mrs. Wemple was of Revolutionary ancestry, three of her great-grandfathers having served under Washington during the dark days of the Revolutionary War. She was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and a charter member of James Ross Chapter of Kansas City, Kansas, which was named in honor of one of her ancestors.

      She leaves surviving her a son, Flint L. Wemple, and a daughter, Mrs. F. D. Hutchings, wife of Judge Hutchings of this city. Her son resides in Camaguey, Cuba, and is Vice President of the Cuba Railway and American Consul at Camaguey. She also leaves a sister, Mrs. E. M. Hewins, of Amarillo, Texas, widow of the late Ed. M. Hewins, one of the firm of Hewins & Titus, large ranchmen of Kansas and Oklahoma. Mr. Hewins was State Senator from Elk County, Kansas, in 1885, and for years was prominent in Kansas politics.

      The funeral was held at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. F. D. Hutchings, 624 Freeman avenue, Tuesday, June 25, 1918, and interment took place June 26, in Topeka Cemetery, Topeka, Kansas, beside her husband and children.


  • Sources 
    1. E-mail to David Wemple from Mary Lynn McManus Toluchanian dated 1/6/2003.


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