Hendrick WEMPLE

Male 1730 - Aft 1790  (> 61 years)


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  • Name Hendrick WEMPLE 
    Born 1730 
    Gender Male 
    Died Aft 1790 
    Person ID I824  Wemple Family Ancestry
    Last Modified 13 Dec 2017 

    Father Myndert WEMPLE,   b. Bef 24 Aug 1691, Albany, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1785  (Age < 93 years) 
    Mother Alida DEWANDELAER,   b. Bef 18 Dec 1695, Albany, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1785  (Age < 89 years) 
    Married 29 Jun 1718  Schenectady, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F208  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Aefje VAN EPPS,   b. (BEF. 5 Jan 1734/35),   d. Bef 1830 
    Married 11 Jan 1755 
    Children 
     1. Alida WEMPLE,   b. Bef 07 Mar 1756,   d. Bef 1851  (Age < 94 years)
     2. Jane WEMPLE,   b. Dec 1757, near Caughnawaga, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 07 Sep 1840, Syracuse, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 82 years)
     3. Maria WEMPLE,   b. Bef 01 Dec 1759, Caughnawaga, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1854  (Age < 94 years)
     4. Catarina WEMPLE,   b. Bef 17 Mar 1761,   d. 18 Dec 1840, Glen, Montgomery County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 79 years)
     5. Johann Myndert WEMPLE,   b. 28 Nov 1764, Caughnawaga, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jun 1837, Wampsville, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     6. Volkje WEMPLE,   b. Bef 20 Oct 1769,   d. Bef 1865  (Age < 95 years)
     7. John Van Epps WIMPLE,   b. Abt 1772, Fonda, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1852, Wampsville, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 80 years)
    Last Modified 13 Dec 2017 
    Family ID F478  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • The following was sent to the compiler by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI on September 5, 1996:

      Excerpts from the JOURNAL OF THE REVERAND SAMUEL KIRKLAND, missionary to the Seneca Indians:

      Feb'y. 8th. The Indians convened a little before noon, when we were invited to the council house, and fortunately for me, a Dutch trader (Hendrick Wemple), who had lived many years among the Senecas, had just arrived on his way to Niagara, who had a tolerable understanding of their language, especially for common conversation. He spoke English intelligibly, though very incorrectly. . . In the course of a week, while this Dutchman tarried with me, I had frequent opportunities of conversing with them (the Indians), though by a poor interpreter, and they were continually visiting me . . .

      March 16th. Informed by some Indians from the westward, that a Mr. Wemp would probably leave Niagara in the course of ten or twelve days, and tarry with me here a few days and rest himself. I may have mentioned this man before. He was in years past employed as a blacksmith for the Indians in this principal town of the Senecas, called Kanadasigea, and sometimes traded among them. He understands their language pretty well, for common conversation, but can but poorly comprehend a public speech, delivered in an oratorical style and dress. Being of Dutch extraction, he speaks rather broken and incorrect English, and in general, a bad pronunciation of the Seneca. But being a humane, peaceable, and honest man, I find the Indians set a great deal by him. I shall endeavor to detain him when he arrives, as long as will be consistent with his business, and we find anything for him to eat.

      April 4th. Mr. Wemp returns from Niagara, made very welcome, particularly by my family and many others. I expressed my earnest desire, and hoped that he would tarry a week, or at least several days with us, to rest himself properly. Had but little conversation with him . . . and (mostly) the distressed situation of the town, from the scarcity of corn.

      From papers sent to the compiler by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI on July 1, 1999:

      Excerpts from PHELPSE GORMAN'S PURCHASE:

      HENDRICK WEMPLE

      (From Manuscripts of W.H.C. Hosmer)

      He was the father of Mrs. Maria Berry, wife of the late Gilbert R. Berry, pioneer Indian trader, and settler in the valley of the Genesee. In advance of civilization, this remarkable man, frequently visited the Indian villages of western New York - and sometimes extended his journeys by water, in a birch canoe, manned by Indians, to Detroit, and thence to Mackinaw and the Straits of St. Mary's. His place of residence was near Caughnawaga, on the Mohawk, at the breaking out of hostilities. He afterwards removed to the Oneida Castle.

      John Scott Quackenboss, a kinsman, and who knew him in his boyhood, describes him as a man of majestic proportions, more than six feet in height, and endowed by nature with great personal strength and agility. His influence was great among the Oneidas and Mohawks, being familiar with the customs, and their superior(ity) in all athletic sports. He accompanied by special invitation, General Herkimer and party, in their perilous expedition to Unadilla in 1777, and acted as interpreter at an interview between Brant and the gallant old Germans, on that occasion. He was also interpreter for Sullivan, and in that capacity served in the great Indian campaign of 1779, accompanying the army in their march through a howling wilderness, and hostile country, to the valley of the Genesee, where his daughter and son-in-law consequently settled and died. My informant, Mr. Scott, of Mohawk, in Montgomery county, alluded particularly to his skill as a marksman, having been his companion in many a hunt. He also spoke with great fluency, all the dialects of the Iroquois, besides having a knowledge of many western tongues.

      Soon after the close of the Revolutionary war, while in a forest that bordered the Mohawk, he was the unseen spectator of a murder, perpetuated by a Mohawk know as Saucy Nick - the victim being unconscious at the time he received the fatal blow, of an enemy being in the neighborhood. After he returned to his home, he saddled a horse of the purpose of procuring process of the Indian's arrest. On his way to the magistrate's office, a few miles distant - he stopped at a public house, observing Saucy Nick standing on the steps, and wishing a close watch to be kept on the murderer's movements. After the necessary warning had been given, he was about to to leave, when Saucy Nick importuned him to treat, and insisted that Mr. Wemple should drink with him.

      To lull the Indian's suspicions, which he thought had been forcibly aroused, he drank with him, and mounted his horse; he had been in the saddle but a few minutes, when he was attacked with a severe pain, and a sense of of mortal sickness. With difficulty he dismounted and was assisted to a bed. He tongue swelled until to protruded from his mouth, and the next day, after indescribable agony, he died.

      It was generally believed by his neighbors and friends, that the Indian had had secret intelligence of the design to arrest him, and adroitly drugged, with some subtle poison, the liquor of this unsuspecting victim. The murderer effected his escape, and joined his tribe in Canada. Hendrick Wemple was buried close to Oneida Castle, on the north side of the turnpike, about one mile from Skenandoah's residence.

      In his lifetime, he claimed a large portion of territory, afterwards bought by Judge Cooper, of Coopertown, and embracing some of the best lands of Otsego county. He was a descendant of Hendrick Wemple, one of the original proprietors of Schenectady - the O-no-al-i-gone of the Oneidas - and whose ares, Giles F. Yates informs me, may still be seen over the door of an old Dutch church, one of the most cherished antiquities of the city. He name in no tout of place in the local work.

      He was a transit resident in this region previous to the Revolution, and many of his descendants are now residents of the Genesee Country.


      The following is from a manuscript sent to the compiler on September 28, 2000 by Michael Lee Wemple of Bay City, MI. This manuscript was written by William Barent Wemple, compiler of the first part if this genealogy from 1885-1913. The manuscript was never published.

      He was born in 1730 and married on January 11, 1755, in Schenectady, Aefje, daughter of Johannes E. Van Epps and Anna Van Vechten, who was baptized January 5, 1735, in Schenectady.

      Hendrick was very early employed in the Indian Service, taking naturally to it on account of familiarity and constant contact, owing to his father's long connection with it.

      In the SIR Wm. JOHNSON MANUSCRIPTS, volume 26, page 26, (State Library, Albany, NY), is an account in which Sir Wm. charges the Crown, March 22, 1764, with To Hendrick Wemp for carrying up General's letters to Niagara in ye deep snow, 52 days L36. 8. 0. On April 29 and May 22, 1765, Lieutenant Hendrick Wemp and (his brother) Barent Wemp attended conferences with the Six Nations and Delawares at Johnson's residence.

      The following letter written by Hendrick to Sir Wm. Johnson at Johnson Hall is in volume 11, page 94 of SIR Wm. JOHNSON MANUSCRIPTS:

      Honor Sir

      These are to inform you that ye Indian, Hendrick, is come from your house to this place in two days --- and he had a proposition --- according to your orders at Canajoharie, and told them ye news but they pretended not to understand it an none would go with him. Hendrick, ye Indian, and his son and myself are a going to set off on our journey this day at about eleven o'clock, as there is nobody a going with us. The two Indians, which was to go to Detried, are not yet come and I think it is the best way for us to proceed to ye upper Castels and strive to get others there and send them forward impatiently.

      No more at present, but remain

      Yours at Command,

      Hendrick Wempel, Je'r.

      P.S. Here is no King's provetions, so I think we must buy in as reasonable as we can.

      Sir Wm. Johnson's account entitled EXPENSE ACCT OF THE INDIAN DEPARTMENT in volume 26, page 33, of the MANUSCRIPTS, contains these two items, November 2, 1765. To Hendrick Wemp and an Indian, 38 days, at 8p., carrying messages from me to Chenussio and the Western Nations, together with his expenses, L22. 10. 0. March 20, 1766. To Hendrick Wemp's acct for burying an Indian woman, a stranger, L2. 9. 0.

      A portion of Jelles Fonda's letter to Sir Wm. Johnson, in volume 17, page 213, of JOHNSON MANUSCRIPTS is as follows:

      Caughnawaga, 14th July 1769

      The bearer of this, Mr. Steel, (I) have sent up with the provisions and goods Mr. Adams and I have brought to trade with the Five Nations. If it is agreeable to you, (I) should be glad (if) you would let Ber'd Wemp return with him as he is better acquainted with the Indians and their language than any of the rest of the men he has now with him. You may have any of his hands in Wemp's stead you may please to take. . . . I am in hopes Mr. Steel, with Ber'd or Hendrick Wemp. will make out very well.

      You'll please too give them such directions and advice as you shall think best, which you may depend shall be punctually observed by them.

      November 30, 1769, a grant of 100.000 acres of land on the south side of the Mohawk River, was made to 100 persons, Hendrick being one of the parties (see document No. 53).

      Hendrick was also a participant on a grant made August 25, 1774, for 40,000 acres in Charlotte County on the Hudson Rover and with this there was to be a new township erected called HYDE. This patent is recorded in volume 16, at page 409, of BOOK OF PATENTS, in the Secretary of State's office, Albany, NY

      He served during the Revolution in the company of Associated Exempts of Tryon County, commanded by Captain Jelles Fonda; he was at first a sergeant but afterwards was promoted to corporal.

      The original will of Hendrick's father-in-law, John E. Van Epps, is in possession of Mr. Lewis Van Epps, of Fultonville, NY, who has kindly permitted a copy to be made of it and as it mentions five of Hendrick Wemple's children, it is given in full, being as follows

      In the grace of God Amen I John E. Van Epps of the town of Mohawk in the County of Montgomery in the State of New York being in perfect health of of sound and disposing mind and memory (praised be God for the same) but considering the uncertainty of this transitory life and being desirous to settle my worldly affairs I have strength and capacity to do, To make and publish this my Last Will and Testament hereby revoking and making void all former and other wills and testaments by me at any time heretofore made of my Creator who gave it, and my body to the earth to be enterred at the discretion of my executor hereinafter named; and as to such worldly estate herewith God has pleased to interest me I dispose of the same as follows;

      Imprimis I will order and desire that all such debts as I (have) shall be paid at my decease together with any funeral charges the expenses shall be justly and fully paid by my executors;

      Item I give devise and bequeath all my real estate and every part and parcel thereof unto my son Evert Van Eps from henceforth for and during this natural life; and . . . of my said son Evert Van Eps then I give and devise all my said real estate and every part and parcel thereof unto my grandson John E. Van Eps Junior; To have and hold my said real estate and every part and parcel thereof unto my said Grandson John E. Van Eps junior his heirs and assigns forever;

      Item I give and bequeath unto my Grandson John Wemple the sum of five pounds lawful money of the state aforesaid to be paid to him the said John Wemple or his executors administrators and assigns within eight years next after my decease.

      Item I give and bequeath unto my Grand daughter Alida Wemple the sum of five pounds of lawful money. aforesaid to be paid to her my said Grand daughter Alida Wemple or her executors administrators or assigns within eight years next after my decease.

      Item I give and bequeath unto my Grand daughter Folkie Wemple the sum of five pounds lawful money to be paid to her my said Grand daughter Folkie Wemple or her executors administrators or assigns within eight years next after my decease.

      Item I give and bequeath unto my Grand daughter Jane (now the wife of John Staring) the sum of five pounds lawful money to be paid to her my said Grand daughter Jane or her executors administrators or assigns within eight years next after my decease.

      Item I give and bequeath unto my Grand daughter Catherine (now the wife of Abraham Quackenboss) the sum of five pounds lawful money to be paid to her my said Grand daughter Catherine or her executors administrators or assigns within eight years next after my decease.

      Item I give and bequeath unto my Step Daughter Catherine Van Eps (now the wife of Charles Van Eps) the sum of five pounds lawful money to be paid to her my said step daughter Catherine or her executors administrators or assigns within eight years next after my decease.

      Item I give and bequeath unto my daughter Mary who is now the wife of Andrew Mitchel Esquire the sum of forty pounds lawful money to be paid to her my said Grand daughter Mary or her executors administrators or assigns within eight years next after my decease.

      Item I give and bequeath the rest of and residue of all my personal estate of unto my son Evert Van Eps his executors administrators and assigns forever ---

      Lastly I make and nominate and appoint my son Evert Van Eps and my loving friend Richard Hoff the executors of this my last will and testament. In witness thereof I the said John E. Van Eps have to this my said last will and testament set my hand and seal the fourth day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand and seven hundred and ninety one.

      . . .

      (signed)
      John E. Van Eps

      (witnessed by)
      John Stathorn
      John S. Visscher

      An excerpt from a journel written by the Reverand Samuel Kirkland and sent to the compiler by Michael L. Wemple, Bay City, MI 24 February 2003:

      Hendrick Wemple In advance of civilization. this remarkable man frequendy visited the Indian villages of western New York and sometimes extended bi-journies by water, in a birch canoe, manned by Indians, to Detroit, and thence to Mackinaw and the Straits of St. Mary 's. His place of residence was near Caugbnawaga, on the Mobawk, at the breaking out of hostilities. He afterwards removed to the Oneida Casde. . . . a man of majestic proportions, more than six feet in height, and endowed by nature with great personal strength and agility. His influence was great among the Oneidas and Mohawks, being familiar with their customs, and their superior in all athletic sports. . . . He also spoke with great fluency, all the dialects of the Iroquois, besides having a knowledge of many western tongues. . . ,
      after the close of the Revolutionary war. . . be was the unseen spectator of a murder, purpetrated by a Mohawk, known as Saucy Nick [who poisoned Wemple). [He was buried close to the Oneida Casde, on the north side of the turnpike, about one mile from Skerandoah.s residence.. .. He was a descendant of Hendrick Wemple, one of the original proprietors of Schenectady.]



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